forget

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an elephant never forgets

One remembers everything. A play on the idea that elephants have great memories. I don't think we can pick up where we were before you betrayed me because an elephant never forgets! I would be hesitant to cross him—he's a dangerous man, and an elephant never forgets.
See also: elephant, forget, never

Forget (about) it!

 
1. Inf. Drop the subject!; Never mind!; Don't bother me with it. Jane: Then, there's this matter of the unpaid bills. Bill: Forget it! You'll have to pay them all! Sally: What's this I hear about you and Tom? Sue: Forget about it! I don't want to talk to you about it.
2. Inf. Nothing. Sue: What did you say? Mary: Forget it! Tom: Now I'm ready to go. Sue: Excuse me? Tom: Oh, nothing. Just forget it.
3. Inf. You're welcome.; It was nothing. John: Thank you so much for helping me! Bill: Oh, forget it!' Bob: We're all very grateful to you for coming into work today on your day off. Mary: Forget about it! No problem!
See also: forget

forget about someone or something

 
1. to put someone or something out of one's mind. Don't forget about me! You ought to forget about all that.
2. to fail to remember something at the appropriate time. She forgot about paying the electric bill until the lights were turned off. She forgot about the children and they were left standing on the corner.
See also: forget

forget one's manners

to do something ill-mannered. Jimmy! Have we forgotten our manners?
See also: forget, manner

forget oneself

to forget one's manners or training. (Said in formal situations in reference to belching, bad table manners, and, in the case of very young children, pants-wetting.) Sorry, Mother, I forgot myself. John, we are going out to dinner tonight. Please don't forget yourself.
See also: forget

Forget you!

Sl. Drop dead!; Beat it! Oh, yeah! Forget you! Forget you! Get a life!
See also: forget

Forgive and forget.

Prov. You should not only forgive people for hurting you, you should also forget that they ever hurt you. When my sister lost my favorite book, I was angry at her for weeks, but my mother finally convinced me to forgive and forget. Jane: Are you going to invite Sam to your party? Sue: No way. Last year he laughed at my new skirt. Jane: Come on, Sue, forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

Remember to write,

 and Don't forget to write. 
1. Lit. a final parting comment made to remind someone going on a journey to write to those remaining at home. Alice: Bye. Mary: Good-bye, Alice. Remember to write. Alice: I will. Bye. Sally: Remember to write! Fred: I will!
2. Fig. a parting comment made to someone in place of a regular good-bye. (Jocular.) John: See you tomorrow. Bye. Jane: See you. Remember to write. John: Okay. See you after lunch. Jane: Yeah. Bye. Remember to write.
See also: remember, write

forget about something

do not expect something The hotel has room service, but forget about anyone wheeling an elegant meal into your room.
See also: forget

forget (about) it

(spoken)
1. do not even ask about it People point at our car when we drive down the road, and when we stop somewhere, forget about it. I enjoyed dinner, but as for the party, well, forget it!
Usage notes: used to say that something was so extreme it would be impossible to describe it, and sometimes humorously spelled fuggedaboutit to show how it is said
2. do not think or worry about it Want to have it all? Forget it! It can't be done. One editor's attitude was, if you understood all of it, fine, and if not, forget about it.
See also: forget

forgive and forget

to accept and not think about what someone has done to you If they can admit they were wrong, then they can surely forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

forget it

Overlook it, it's not important; you're quite mistaken. This colloquial imperative is used in a variety of ways. For example, in Thanks so much for helping-Forget it, it was nothing, it is a substitute for "don't mention it" or you're welcome; in Stop counting the change-forget it! it means "stop doing something unimportant" in You think assembling this swingset was easy-forget it! it means "it was not at all easy"; and in Forget it-you'll never understand this theorem it means that the possibility of your understanding it is hopeless. [c. 1900]
See also: forget

forget oneself

Lose one's reserve, temper, or self-restraint; do or say something out of keeping with one's position or character. For example, A teacher should never forget herself and shout at the class. Shakespeare used it in Richard II (3:2): "I had forgot myself: am I not king?" [Late 1500s]
See also: forget

forgive and forget

Both pardon and hold no resentment concerning a past event. For example, After Meg and Mary decided to forgive and forget their differences, they became good friends . This phrase dates from the 1300s and was a proverb by the mid-1500s. For a synonym, see let bygones be bygones.
See also: and, forget, forgive

Forget it!

1. exclam. Never mind, it wasn’t important! I had an objection, but just forget it!
2. exclam. Never mind, it was no trouble at all! No trouble at all. Forget it!
See also: forget

Forget you!

exclam. Drop dead!; Beat it! (Possibly euphemistic for Fuck you!) Forget you! Get a life!
See also: forget

forget (oneself)

To lose one's reserve, temper, or self-restraint.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapters address the purposes of cross and building a case theory; concession-seeking cross; witness impeachment; the cross-examiner's character and conduct in trial; controlling the unruly witness; witness preparation; expert witnesses; problems presented by adverse witnesses, deponents, forgetters, and interview refusers, among others; the ethical and legal bounds of cross; and how to avoid and meet objections to cross-examination questions.
With queues at checkouts across Wales likely to be long, Asda has introduced 140 festive Go Getters for Forgetters to its Welsh stores, who go and collect items from shelves which shoppers have forgotten.
By this, Dubois does not suggest "that there is a group of forgetters and another of rememberers.
While trying to suppress their memories, the best forgetters displayed particularly intense blood flow--indicating elevated neural activity--in the prefrontal cortex and unusually little blood flow in the hippocampus.
Around a third (35%) fail to remember work information or deadlines, which can have dire consequences - since 7% of the forgetters have had trouble at work or been fired as a result.