forced


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Related to forced: Forced Exposure

force (one's) hand

To push one to do something that one is not inclined to do otherwise. (The phrase alludes to a hand of playing cards.) Dave still hasn't decided where he wants to go to dinner, so I'm going to force his hand—I need to make reservations as soon as possible! I was hoping to play golf today, but the storm forced my hand, so I stayed home instead. The president is trying to force Congress's hand by threatening a veto.
See also: force, hand

force the pace

To dictate how fast someone or something moves; to set the pace. They're the best team in the league, so we need to force the pace of the game if we want to have any chance of beating them.
See also: force, pace

force back

1. To cause someone or something to move away from someone or something else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "back." I jumped in front of the kids to force them back from the street.
2. To cause someone or something to return to something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "back." The bell signaling the end of recess forced us back to class.
3. To contain one's emotions. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "back." I found myself forcing back tears during the play because the acting was just so good.
See also: back, force

force down

1. To compel or physically force someone to swallow something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "down." This medicine tastes disgusting, but I do want to get better, so I'll force it down. The government has come under fire for ordering prison staff to force food down the hunger strikers' throats.
2. To push someone or something down. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "down." Back when I used to be bigger than my brother, I could force him down with ease—not anymore!
3. To cause someone or something to move downward, such as a plane. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "down." Severe turbulence forced the plane down—it had to make an emergency landing in Phoenix.
See also: down, force

force (someone or something) off on (someone )

To impose someone or something on one. Why are you trying to force all of these old hats off on me? You're cleaning out your attic, aren't you? I forced the kids off a babysitter so that I could get some errands done in peace.
See also: force, off, on

force on (someone or something)

1. To force or impose something on one. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "on." Management is trying to force mandatory overtime on us. Why are you trying to force all of these old hats off on me? You're cleaning out your attic, aren't you?
2. To demand that someone or something continue or persist. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "on." My dog tried to lie down and take a nap at the end of our block, but I forced her on so I wouldn't have to carry her to our door.
3. To rape someone. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is used between "force" and "on." Stay away from that guy—I hear he likes to try to force himself on drunk girls.
See also: force, on

force out

1. verb To cause someone or something to leave some place or thing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "out." If you don't leave this minute, I'll get one of the bouncers to force you out! A concussion forced their best player out of the playoffs.
2. verb In baseball, to get a runner out at the base they must advance to. (For instance, when a ball is hit, a runner on first base must advance to second base—even if a ground ball has been hit directly to the second baseman, who can then easily step on the base and get the runner out.) A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "out." Ugh, they forced out our best base runner at second.
3. noun In baseball, the act of getting a runner out on such a play. When used as a noun, the phrase is often hyphenated. I told our second baseman to get the force-out if the ball is hit to him.
See also: force, out

force off

1. To persuade or pressure someone or an animal to get off of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "off." I wanted the kids to go outside and play in this gorgeous sunshine, but I practically had to force them off the couch. A: "Good luck forcing off the dog." B: "Ugh, but she's on my side of the bed."
2. To persuade or pressure someone to resign from or leave a group. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "off." Now that we know Fred's involved in the scandal too, we need to force him off the board.
See also: force, off

force (someone or an animal) from (something)

To persuade or pressure someone or an animal to leave or move away from something. Security guards forced the onlookers from the crime scene. Good luck forcing the dog from the bedroom—she thinks our bed is just a giant dog bed now.
See also: force

force (someone or an animal) out of (something)

1. To persuade or pressure someone or an animal to leave or move away from something. Security guards forced the onlookers out of the room where the crime had been committed. Good luck forcing the dog out of the bedroom—she thinks our bed is just a giant dog bed now.
2. To persuade or pressure someone to resign from a prominent, authoritative position. Do you think these accusations are credible or just an attempt to force the CEO out of his position?
See also: force, of, out

force (someone or something) through (something)

1. To physically push, shove, or jam someone or something into a particular space or thing. Hey, that box is full of breakables—don't just force it through that opening! I forced my little brother through the door of the haunted house despite his protests.
2. To aggressively act to ensure that something is accepted, approved, or allowed by some body or entity, especially amidst opposition. Good luck trying to force that bill through Congress—you're in for quite a fight.
See also: force, through

force someone or something down

to press or push someone or something downward. I forced him down and slipped the handcuffs on him. The cop forced down the thug and handcuffed him. I forced the dog down and held it there.
See also: down, force

force someone or something off (of) something

 and force someone or something off 
1. Lit. to get someone, something, or an animal off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) I had to force the cat off the sofa. She just wouldn't be coaxed off. I had to force off the cat. She is so stubborn.
2. Fig. to make someone or a group resign from a board, committee, panel, etc. They forced her off the board before she could change any of their policies. They forced off the dissenters as well as the CEO.
See also: force, off

force something down

to force oneself to swallow something. I can't stand sweet potatoes, but I manage to force them down just to keep from making a scene. She forced down the sweet potatoes.
See also: down, force

force the pace

adopt a fast pace in a race in order to tire out your opponents quickly.
See also: force, pace

force the ˈpace

(especially British English) make somebody do something more quickly or make something happen more quickly: The government is forcing the pace on economic reforms and the public don’t like it.
If you force the pace in a race, you force the other runners to run as fast as you because you want them to get tired.
See also: force, pace

force back

v.
1. To make someone or something retreat or return: A terrible storm forced the soldiers back to the camp. Hard up for money, the strikers were forced back to work.
2. To prevent the expression of one's own emotions: She forced back her laughter as she listened to the debate. He forced his anger back when he read the editorial.
See also: back, force

force down

v.
1. To cause someone or something to descend or land by use of force: Engine failure forced down the aircraft. On sighting the hostile helicopter, the soldier engaged it and forced it down.
2. To swallow something that one does not want to swallow: To be polite, I forced down the awful-tasting food. I forced the unpleasant cough syrup down.
See also: down, force

force out

v.
1. To make someone or something leave by use of force or out of necessity: She was forced out of the game by a leg injury. The scandal forced him out of the company. The fire forced the animals out of the forest.
2. To cause a runner in baseball to be called out when that player cannot act in any way to prevent it: The catcher forced him out at the plate. She was forced out at second base.
See also: force, out
References in periodicals archive ?
This inefficient system contributed to its own shortcomings when additional supplies were forced through the supply chain.
Also, we've been forced to take the previously unheard of step of hiring Army Guardsman to help us perform the security mission at our CONUS Air Force bases--and even in England, where Guardsmen from Minnesota are working today at Lakenheath and Mildenhall.
The reasonableness of an agent's decision to use deadly force under this policy must be viewed from the perspective of the agent on the scene who may often be forced to make split-second decisions in circumstances that are tense, uncertain, and rapidly evolving and without the advantage of 20/20 hindsight.
Despite this dominance, the demands of our current national security environment have forced us to ask first-principle questions about the direction we are taking, and how we will organize, train, and equip our forces for the future.
Local police agencies also may be forced to tolerate open disregard for liquor laws due to the sheer magnitude of the problem.
Corrosion is now causing major cracks to the oldest F-15s, and at Kadena AB in Japan, they have been forced to replace five wings in the past seven months.
As the pilot struggled to get out of the kill zone and gain control of his severely damaged helicopter, Navy SEAL Petty Officer 1st Class Nell Roberts was lost overboard and the crew was forced to make an emergency landing about five kilometers away.