footing


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lose (one's) footing

1. To stumble and/or fall, typically during a physical activity such as walking. I sprained my ankle when I lost my footing on a hike. Be careful not to lose your footing while you're on the ladder!
2. By extension, to lose one's stability by entering a precarious or unsettling situation. I loved my job, so I really lost my footing when I was laid off. I'm just worried that he'll lose his footing if he drops out of school now—there's no guarantee he'll ever go back.
See also: footing, lose

foot the bill

To pay for something. I hope the production company is footing the bill for all of this air travel.
See also: bill, foot

foot the bill (for something)

Fig. to pay for something; to pay for a bill. My boss took me out for lunch and the company footed the bill. You paid for dinner last time. Let me foot the bill for lunch today.
See also: bill, foot

foot the bill

Pay the bill, settle the accounts, as in The bride's father was resigned to footing the bill for the wedding. This expression uses foot in the sense of "add up and put the total at the foot, or bottom, of an account." [Colloquial; early 1800s]
See also: bill, foot

foot the bill

COMMON If you foot the bill for something, you pay for it. Police will have to foot the bill for the damage to both cars. If the insurance industry were to foot the entire bill for pollution, it would bankrupt it. Note: This expression may come from the practice of someone paying a bill and signing it at the bottom, or `foot'.
See also: bill, foot

foot the bill

be responsible for paying for something.
See also: bill, foot

foot the ˈbill (for something)

be responsible for paying the cost of something: The local council will have to foot the bill for damage done to the roads in last years’s floods.
See also: bill, foot