footed


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Related to footed: flat footed

catch (someone) flat-footed

To startle someone; to come upon someone unawares and/or when they are unprepared. Usually used in the past tense. The security guard caught the thieves flat-footed. That essay question in the exam caught me completely flat-footed.
See also: catch

heavy-footed

Clumsy, ponderous, or lumbering in gait or tread. The team's star striker deftly navigated the ball past the heavy-footed defenseman.

flat footed

1. Slow to react. Unprepared. Often used in the phrase "caught flat footed." That goal was my fault, guys, I got caught flat footed on the play.
2. Clumsy and awkward. Don't trust her carrying that vase, she's so flat footed. I would change your opening argument—it's a little flat footed right now.
See also: flat, footed

foot the bill

To pay for something. I hope the production company is footing the bill for all of this air travel.
See also: bill, foot

catch someone red-handed

 and catch someone flat-footed
to catch a person in the act of doing something wrong. (See also caught red-handed.) Tom was stealing the car when the police drove by and caught him red-handed. Mary tried to cash a forged check at the bank, and the teller caught her red-handed.
See also: catch

foot the bill (for something)

Fig. to pay for something; to pay for a bill. My boss took me out for lunch and the company footed the bill. You paid for dinner last time. Let me foot the bill for lunch today.
See also: bill, foot

catch red-handed

Also, catch in the act. Apprehend someone in the course of wrongdoing, as in The boys were trying to steal a car and the police caught them red-handed, or He tried to cheat on the exam, but his teacher walked in and caught him in the act. The first term referred to blood on a murderer's hands and originally signified only that crime. Later it was extended to any offense. The variant ( catch in the act) is a translation of the Latin in flagrante delicto, part of the Roman code and long used in English law.
See also: catch

caught flat-footed

Caught unprepared, taken by surprise, as in The reporter's question caught the President flat-footed. This usage comes from one or another sport in which a player should be on his or her toes, ready to act. [c. 1900]
See also: caught

foot the bill

Pay the bill, settle the accounts, as in The bride's father was resigned to footing the bill for the wedding. This expression uses foot in the sense of "add up and put the total at the foot, or bottom, of an account." [Colloquial; early 1800s]
See also: bill, foot

foot the bill

COMMON If you foot the bill for something, you pay for it. Police will have to foot the bill for the damage to both cars. If the insurance industry were to foot the entire bill for pollution, it would bankrupt it. Note: This expression may come from the practice of someone paying a bill and signing it at the bottom, or `foot'.
See also: bill, foot

be caught flat-footed

If someone is caught flat-footed ,they are put at a disadvantage when something happens which they do not expect. `The people around were caught flat-footed,' said Mr. Enko. `Nobody expected floods of such magnitude.' Note: You can also say that an event or action leaves someone flat-footed. Pentland had agreed to buy Adidas but pulled out of the deal suddenly, leaving the French millionaire flat-footed.
See also: caught

foot the bill

be responsible for paying for something.
See also: bill, foot

catch someone flat-footed

take someone by surprise or at a disadvantage. informal
The opposite of flat-footed in this metaphorical sense is on your toes (see toe).
1998 Field Farming and forestry were both caught flat-footed when fashion changed.
See also: catch

foot the ˈbill (for something)

be responsible for paying the cost of something: The local council will have to foot the bill for damage done to the roads in last years’s floods.
See also: bill, foot