food


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Related to food: Food security

eat (one's) own dog food

1. To use the product(s) one's company produces or develops as a means of demonstrating or validating its quality, capabilities, or superiority to other brands. Used primarily in reference to software industries, the phrase is thought to have originated with advertisements for Alpo dog food in the 1980s, in which actor Lorne Green promoted the product by pointing out that he fed it to his own dogs. The company sent out a memo to all of its employees telling them to eat their own dog food to demonstrate their new operating system's speed and ease of use.
2. By extension, to use software one's company is developing—usually in its beta form—so as to test it for flaws and ensure its ease of use by end users before it is released. We didn't have time to eat our own dog food before the new operating system's release, so I'm worried it may still have a lot of glitches that haven't been accounted for yet.
See also: dog, eat, food

dogfood

1. To use the product(s) one's company produces or develops as a means of demonstrating or validating its quality, capabilities, or superiority to other brands. Used primarily in reference to software industries, the phrase is thought to have originated with advertisements for Alpo dog food in the 1980s, in which actor Lorne Green promoted the product by pointing out that he fed it to his own dogs. The company sent out a memo to all of its employees telling them to dogfood their new operating system to demonstrate its speed and ease of use to the public. The company has a strict policy of dogfooding their website's own messenger system rather than traditional email, much to the consternation of some employees.
2. By extension, to use software one's company is developing—usually in its beta form—so as to test it for flaws and ensure its ease of use by end users before it is released. We didn't have time to dogfood the new operating system before its release, so I'm worried it may still have a lot of glitches that haven't been accounted for yet.

at the bottom of the food chain

At or occupying the position of least importance or influence in a social, corporate, or political hierarchy. As an intern, you're always at the bottom of the food chain, so be prepared to do whatever anyone else tells you to do.
See also: bottom, chain, food, of

at the top of the food chain

At or occupying the position of most importance or influence in a social, corporate, or political hierarchy. Some high school seniors revel in the fact that they are now at the top of the food chain, using their newfound and largely imaginary authority to boss around younger students.
See also: chain, food, of, top

put food on the table

To earn enough money to provide the basic necessities for oneself and (often) one's family. With my hours at work being cut so dramatically, I just don't know how I'll be able to put food on the table. At the end of the day, as long as I'm putting food on the table, I don't care what kind of career I have.
See also: food, on, put, table

food baby

A large and/or protruding stomach (thought to resemble a pregnant belly) after one has eaten a big meal. Don't take any pictures right now, my stomach is huge! I totally have a food baby!
See also: baby, food

food chain

1. A hierarchy of organisms that transfer food energy between them. The smallest organisms are at the bottom—and they are preyed upon by the larger ones above them in the food chain. Grizzly bears are at the top of the food chain.
2. A hierarchy of people in a group or organization. Often used in the phrases "at the top of the food chain" and "at the bottom of the food chain." As a medical intern, I'm at the bottom of the food chain, but I'll move up soon enough. It will take a while to move up the food chain in such a large company, but you'll make manager soon enough.
See also: chain, food

food for worms

A dead person. You better drive more carefully, unless you want to be food for worms!
See also: food, Worms

flavor food with something

to season a food with something. He flavors his gravy with a little sage. Can you flavor the soup with a little less pepper next time?
See also: flavor, food

food for thought

Fig. something for someone to think about; issues to be considered. Your essay has provided me with some interesting food for thought. My adviser gave me some food for thought about job opportunities.
See also: food, thought

starve for some food

to be very hungry for something. I am just starved for some fresh peaches. We were starved for dinner by the time we finally got to eat.
See also: food, starve

*to go

 
1. [of a purchase of cooked food] to be taken elsewhere to be eaten. (*Typically: buy some food ~; get some food ~; have some food ~; order some food ~.) Let's stop here and buy six hamburgers to go. I didn't thaw anything for dinner. Let's stop off on the way home and get something to go.
2. [of a number or an amount] remaining; yet to be dealt with. I finished with two of them and have four to go.

food for thought

something worth thinking about seriously Thanks for your suggestion - it gave us lots of food for thought.
See also: food, thought

(something) to go

packed or wrapped to take with you I'd like two cheeseburgers to go. The ads say these bars offer complete, balanced nutrition to go.

give somebody food for thought

to make someone think seriously about something What you've suggested has certainly given me food for thought.
See also: food, give, thought

food for thought

An idea or issue to ponder, as in That interesting suggestion of yours has given us food for thought. This metaphoric phrase, transferring the idea of digestion from the stomach to mulling something over in the mind, dates from the late 1800s, although the idea was also expressed somewhat differently at least three centuries earlier.
See also: food, thought

junk food

Prepackaged snack food that is high in calories but low in nutritional value; also, anything attractive but negligible in value. For example, Nell loves potato chips and other junk food, or When I'm sick in bed I often resort to TV soap operas and similar junk food. [c. 1970]
See also: food, junk

junk food

n. food that is typically high in fats and salt and low in nutritional value; food from a fast-food restaurant. Junk food tastes good no matter how greasy it is.
See also: food, junk

rabbit food

n. lettuce; salad greens. Rabbit food tends to have a lot of vitamin C.
See also: food, rabbit

squirrel-food

n. a nut; a loony person. The driver of the car—squirrel-food, for sure—just sat there smiling. Some squirrel-food came over and asked for a sky hook.

to go

mod. packaged to be taken out; packaged to be carried home to eat. Do you want it to go, or will you eat it here?

worm-food

n. a corpse. You wanna end up worm-food? Just keep smarting off.
References in classic literature ?
You could buy both potatoes and eggs and eat as many as you liked without feeling as if you were taking food out of the mouths of fourteen people.
I would rather you let that alone,' said the man, 'for I do not willingly give myself up to be eaten; if you are wanting food I have enough to satisfy your hunger.
As I made no move to reach the food, the torturers left the light turned on in the hope that at last I could refrain no longer from giving them the delicious thrill of enjoyment that my former futile efforts to obtain it had caused.
We are now in a dreadful plight, and I fear that unless we get food this will be our last day's journey.
Then presently he would meet a man or a woman, yellow-faced and probably negligently dressed and armed--prowling for food.
The food that one eats is supposed to undergo certain chemical changes during the process of digestion and assimilation, the result, of course, being the rebuilding of wasted tissue.
The sight of food aroused again a consciousness of her own gnawing hunger and the thirst that parched her throat.
And as the contents of each became known howls of anger announced the grim truth--there was not an ounce of food upon the boat.
He did not live for food, for shelter, for a comfortable place between the darknesses that rounded existence.
For he realized, without thinking about it at all, that whatever Kwaque did for him, whatever food Kwaque spread for him, really proceeded, not from Kwaque, but from Kwaque's master who was also his master.
Because of the wall and the guards and the watchers, there was more time to hunt and fish and pick roots and berries; there was more food, and better food, and no one went hungry.
Well, you see we're not donkeys," she explained, "and so we're used to other food.
His narrative was often broken by lapses of concentration during which he reverted to his plaintive mumbling for food and recurrence to the statement that there was a way out; but by firmness and patience the Englishman drew out piece-meal a more or less lucid exposition of the remarkable scheme of evolution that rules in Caspak.
I am helping to lay up food for the winter," said the Ant, "and recommend you to do the same.
Stores, nor public buildings, nor all the dwellings of men ever opened their doors to me and let me warm by their fires or permitted me to eat the food of the gods from narrow shelves against the wall.