folks


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

(home) folks

Rur. one's family, especially one's parents. It sure is good to see the home folks again. Sally went to visit her folks.
See also: folk

folks

n. one’s parents. (Always with the possessive.) I’ll have to ask my folks if I can go.
See also: folk
References in classic literature ?
And now but ten men were left of all those that had shot before, and of these ten, six were famous throughout the land, and most of the folk gathered there knew them.
Then the Sheriff came down from his dais and drew near, in all his silks and velvets, to where the tattered stranger stood leaning upon his stout bow, while the good folk crowded around to see the man who shot so wondrously well.
Better that than stealing the deer that thou art placed to guard, like some folk I know.
Besides, if it comes to the cropping of ears, there are other folk who may say their say," quoth the third laborer.
Folks complain that they die at the top and get ragged-looking.
Why don't you folks tell me to take in the slack of my jaw and go home?
However, gentle reader, or simple reader, whichever you may be, lest you should be led to waste your precious time upon these pages, I make so bold as at once to tell you the sort of folk you'll have to meet and put up with, if you and I are to jog on comfortably together.
And so we got to know all the country folk and their ways and songs and stories by heart, and went over the fields and woods and hills, again and again, till we made friends of them all.
Before ever we were born our folks were walkin' across the plains together.
When your folks was waitin' for the railroad to be built an' all the Indians killed off before they dasted to start for California," was Billy's way of proclaiming the new alliance.
On hearing those words I said good-by to the holy folk and went.
Perhaps, all told, the Folk in that day had a vocabulary of thirty or forty sounds.
When he was about seven years old the quiet of his Highland home was broken by the sounds of war, for the Highland folk had risen in rebellion against King George II.
said the fisher folk on the shore, whispering a prayer as they turned to go home.
In those days folk still believed in witches and trembled at a curse; and this one, falling so pat, like a wayside omen, to arrest me ere I carried out my purpose, took the pith out of my legs.