folk


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Related to folk: folk rock, Folk tales

but seriously, folks

A statement meant to draw an audience's attention to a point one wishes to make (which may or may not be serious in nature), often used as a segue after a joke, aside, or something that is non-relevant. I just flew in from Miami, and boy are my arms tired! But seriously, folks, how is everyone tonight? I like a good cheeseburger as much as the next guy, but seriously, folks, does anyone really need one that weighs three pounds?
See also: but, folk

folk devil

Someone or something that is feared because it is seen as a danger to, or a bad influence on, society. Ever since news of the mayor's cheating scandal broke, he has become the town's folk devil. Now that they think we're a part of a radical group, they are trying to run us out of town like a couple of folk devils!
See also: devil, folk

there's nowt so queer as folk

There's nothing as strange as people. This phrase is typically used to emphasize someone's particularly odd behavior. ("Nowt" is a Northern English variaton on "naught.") Primarily heard in UK. Whenever someone does something really bizarre, I remind myself that there's nowt so queer as folk.
See also: folk, queer

dab on them folks

An imperative to celebrate, boast, or show one's superiority by performing the dab, a gesture or dance move in which one nods the head while covering the face with one arm bent at the elbow and the other arm held parallel and outstretched. Dab on them folks out there today! Nobody's stopping you!
See also: dab, folk, on

Different strokes for different folks.

Prov. Different people like different things.; Different people live in different ways. My neighbor spends all his free time working in his garden. I would never want to do that, but different strokes for different folks.
See also: different, folk, stroke

(home) folks

Rur. one's family, especially one's parents. It sure is good to see the home folks again. Sally went to visit her folks.
See also: folk

Idle people have the least leisure.

 and Idle folk have the least leisure.
Prov. If you are not energetic and hardworking, you will never have any free time, since you will have to spend all your time finishing your work. My grandmother always told me not to dawdle, since idle people have the least leisure.
See also: have, idle, least, leisure, people

(It's) different strokes for different folks.

  (mainly American)
something that you say which means that different people like or need different things I've never enjoyed winter sports, but different strokes for different folks.
See a whole new ball game, be chalk and cheese, march to a different drummer, be another different kettle of fish
See also: different, folk, stroke

different strokes for different folks

See also: different, folk, stroke

just folks

Friendly, unpretentious. For example, Politicians meeting the public like to pretend they are just folks, but that's not always true . [First half of 1900s]
See also: folk, just

no accounting for tastes, there's

Individual likes and dislikes defy explanation, as in They painted their house purple-there's really no accounting for tastes. This expression, first put as no disputing about tastes, dates from the mid-1600s; the present wording was first recorded in 1794. A mid-20th-century synonym that originated in the American South is different strokes for different folks. For a far older synonym, see one man's meat.
See also: accounting

different strokes for different folks

phr. different things please different people. Do whatever you like. Different strokes for different folks.
See also: different, folk, stroke

folks

n. one’s parents. (Always with the possessive.) I’ll have to ask my folks if I can go.
See also: folk

just folks

Informal
Down-to-earth, open-hearted.
See also: folk, just
References in classic literature ?
So forth they started in the bright sunlight, from Nottingham Town to Fosse Way and thence to Watling Street; and so they journeyed for two days, until they saw at last the spires and towers of great London Town; and many folks stopped, as they journeyed along, and gazed at the show they made riding along the highways with their flashing armor and gay plumes and trappings.
Then the archers stepped forth to their places, while all the folks shouted with a mighty voice, each man calling upon his favorite yeoman.
Besides, if it comes to the cropping of ears, there are other folk who may say their say," quoth the third laborer.
The black death is the best friend that ever the common folk had in England.
Folks complain that they die at the top and get ragged-looking.
Why don't you folks tell me to take in the slack of my jaw and go home?
Ay, you may well wonder and think it odd you never heard of this before; but wonder or not, as you please, there are hundreds of such things lying about England, which wiser folk than you know nothing of, and care nothing for.
I began to see as all this weighing and sifting what this text means and that text means, and whether folks are saved all by God's grace, or whether there goes an ounce o' their own will to't, was no part o' real religion at all.
It was the Sunday after this that Jerry Moore announces to us, wriggling, that he had an engagement to take supper with Jane and her folks.
Really," said the girl, anxiously, "I must get back as soon as poss'ble to my own folks.
Then I'll sell the land as fast as the folks will want to buy because of the improved ferry system
If this judgment is unbiased and correct, and the little folks find this new story "real Ozzy," I shall be very glad indeed that I wrote it.
In other respects the whole went off very quietly, for the old folks could not bear noise and merriment; but old Dame Snail made a brilliant speech.
If ye has a home, ye has folks; an' I hain't had folks since--dad died.
We're just like old friends, what with the same kind of folks behind us.