fog

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Related to fogs: fog lights

able to fog a mirror

Alive, perhaps barely. (If one holds up a mirror to one's nose or mouth, the breath will cause fog to appear.) I spent the whole day moving furniture, so I'm barely able to fog a mirror now. He'll date any woman who's able to fog a mirror.
See also: able, fog, mirror

able to fog a mirror

Fig. Inf. alive, even if just barely. (Usually jocular. Alludes to the use of a small mirror placed under the nose to tell if a person is breathing or not. (Able to can be replaced with can.) Look, I don't need an athlete to do this job! Anybody able to fog a mirror will do fine!
See also: able, fog, mirror

fog over

[for something made of glass] to become covered over with water vapor. The windshield fogged over because I forgot to turn on the defroster. The mirror fogged over, and I couldn't see to shave.
See also: fog

fog something up

to make something made of glass become covered with a film of water vapor. The moisture fogged the windshield up, and we had to stop to clean it off. The moisture fogged up the glass.
See also: fog, up

fog up

[for something made of glass] to become partially or completely obscured by a film of water vapor. The glass fogged up, and we couldn't see out.
See also: fog, up

in a fog

 and in a haze
Fig. dazed; not paying attention to what is going on around one; not alert. Jane always seems to be in a fog. When I get up, I'm in a fog for an hour. After surgery, I was in a haze until the anesthetic wore off.
See also: fog

in a fog

confused or not aware I was in a fog for several days after my son's accident.
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in a fog

Also, in a haze. Preoccupied, not paying attention; also, at a loss, confused. For example, After the accident he went about in a fog, even though he had not been injured, or Millie always seems to be in a haze; she never knows what's going on. These expressions allude to fog or haze obscuring one's view; the fog usage dates from about 1600, haze from about 1800.
See also: fog

fog in

v.
1. To surround something with fog: The descending mists fogged in the little village. The storm clouds fogged us in on the mountaintop. Because the airport was fogged in, all of the flights were canceled.
2. To cause something to be unable to move safely due to fog. Used chiefly in the passive: The airplane was fogged in and could not land.
See also: fog

fog up

v.
1. To become covered with condensation: The bathroom mirror fogged up after I took a shower.
2. To cause something to become covered with condensation: The steam from the kettle fogged up the kitchen windows. Don't breathe on the lens—you'll fog it up.
3. To become teary-eyed out of a strong sense of emotion: I fogged up when my parents' photo was unveiled.
See also: fog, up
References in classic literature ?
It was soon apparent that Hawkeye had not magnified the power of the fog, for before they had proceeded twenty yards, it was difficult for the different individuals of the party to distinguish each other in the vapor.
I felt quite amused at his unwarranted choler, and while he stumped indignantly up and down I fell to dwelling upon the romance of the fog.
Bazzard returned, accompanied by two waiters--an immovable waiter, and a flying waiter; and the three brought in with them as much fog as gave a new roar to the fire.
But I reckon it was more than a cat-nap, for when I waked up the stars was shining bright, the fog was all gone, and I was spinning down a big bend stern first.
he cried, and then looked round on the blanket of fog.
He held them silent with ghastly stories of the "Yo-hoes" on Monomoy Beach, that mock and terrify lonely clam-diggers; of sand-walkers and dune-haunters who were never properly buried; of hidden treasure on Fire Island guarded by the spirits of Kidd's men; of ships that sailed in the fog straight over Truro township; of that harbour in Maine where no one but a stranger will lie at anchor twice in a certain place because of a dead crew who row alongside at midnight with the anchor in the bow of their old-fashioned boat, whistling - not calling, but whistling - for the soul of the man who broke their rest.
The steps grew louder, and through the fog, as through a curtain, there stepped the man whom we were awaiting.
As to your getting to Trantridge without assistance, it is quite impossible; for, to tell the truth, dear, owing to this fog, which so disguises everything, I don't quite know where we are myself.
The raw afternoon is rawest, and the dense fog is densest, and the muddy streets are muddiest near that leaden-headed old obstruction, appropriate ornament for the threshold of a leaden-headed old corporation, Temple Bar.
It is of Swiss fog, however, that he is speaking, as, in what follows, of Swiss frost:
It brought Perry to his feet as if he had been stung by a wasp, and sent him racing ahead through the blind-ing fog at a gait that I knew must soon end in disaster were it not checked.
A great wall of fog advanced across San Pablo Bay to meet us, and in a few minutes the Reindeer was running blindly through the damp obscurity.
MacConnell trudged off through the fog, and she went slowly upstairs.
A warm, clear night had been followed by a morning of drenching fog.
Kinoos was unafraid, but the sight of them was a hurt to his eyes; so we fled on and on, through the seas and years, till we came to the Great Fog Sea, Negore, of which thou hast heard, but which thou hast never seen.