fog


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able to fog a mirror

Alive, perhaps barely. (If one holds up a mirror to one's nose or mouth, the breath will cause fog to appear.) I spent the whole day moving furniture, so I'm barely able to fog a mirror now. He'll date any woman who's able to fog a mirror.
See also: able, fog, mirror

able to fog a mirror

Fig. Inf. alive, even if just barely. (Usually jocular. Alludes to the use of a small mirror placed under the nose to tell if a person is breathing or not. (Able to can be replaced with can.) Look, I don't need an athlete to do this job! Anybody able to fog a mirror will do fine!
See also: able, fog, mirror

fog over

[for something made of glass] to become covered over with water vapor. The windshield fogged over because I forgot to turn on the defroster. The mirror fogged over, and I couldn't see to shave.
See also: fog

fog something up

to make something made of glass become covered with a film of water vapor. The moisture fogged the windshield up, and we had to stop to clean it off. The moisture fogged up the glass.
See also: fog, up

fog up

[for something made of glass] to become partially or completely obscured by a film of water vapor. The glass fogged up, and we couldn't see out.
See also: fog, up

in a fog

 and in a haze
Fig. dazed; not paying attention to what is going on around one; not alert. Jane always seems to be in a fog. When I get up, I'm in a fog for an hour. After surgery, I was in a haze until the anesthetic wore off.
See also: fog

in a fog

confused or not aware I was in a fog for several days after my son's accident.
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in a fog

Also, in a haze. Preoccupied, not paying attention; also, at a loss, confused. For example, After the accident he went about in a fog, even though he had not been injured, or Millie always seems to be in a haze; she never knows what's going on. These expressions allude to fog or haze obscuring one's view; the fog usage dates from about 1600, haze from about 1800.
See also: fog

fog in

v.
1. To surround something with fog: The descending mists fogged in the little village. The storm clouds fogged us in on the mountaintop. Because the airport was fogged in, all of the flights were canceled.
2. To cause something to be unable to move safely due to fog. Used chiefly in the passive: The airplane was fogged in and could not land.
See also: fog

fog up

v.
1. To become covered with condensation: The bathroom mirror fogged up after I took a shower.
2. To cause something to become covered with condensation: The steam from the kettle fogged up the kitchen windows. Don't breathe on the lens—you'll fog it up.
3. To become teary-eyed out of a strong sense of emotion: I fogged up when my parents' photo was unveiled.
See also: fog, up
References in classic literature ?
The order was instantly obeyed, and the fog was stirred by the explosion of fifty muskets.
The lot of towheads was troubles we was going to get into with quarrelsome people and all kinds of mean folks, but if we minded our business and didn't talk back and aggravate them, we would pull through and get out of the fog and into the big clear river, which was the free States, and wouldn't have no more trouble.
The dripping red headsails of a bark glided out of the fog, and the "We're Here" rang her bell thrice, using sea shorthand.
I sprang to my feet, my inert hand grasping my pistol, my mind paralyzed by the dreadful shape which had sprung out upon us from the shadows of the fog.
Never can there come fog too thick, never can there come mud and mire too deep, to assort with the groping and floundering condition which this High Court of Chancery, most pestilent of hoary sinners, holds this day in the sight of heaven and earth.
It is of Swiss fog, however, that he is speaking, as, in what follows, of Swiss frost:
It brought Perry to his feet as if he had been stung by a wasp, and sent him racing ahead through the blind-ing fog at a gait that I knew must soon end in disaster were it not checked.
Charley pondered a moment, and then answered, "The tide has edged us over a bit out of our course, but if the fog lifts right now, as it is going to lift, you'll find we're not more than a thousand miles off McNear's Landing.
For a long distance the road had been bordered by fields on both sides, but now on the left there was a forest of oaks, madronos, and gigantic spruces whose lower parts only could be seen, dim and ghostly in the fog.
Kinoos was unafraid, but the sight of them was a hurt to his eyes; so we fled on and on, through the seas and years, till we came to the Great Fog Sea, Negore, of which thou hast heard, but which thou hast never seen.
It was an evening of gray fog that had crept in from the gulf, swathed the harbor, filled the glens and valleys, and clung heavily to the autumnal meadows.
The danger lay in the heavy fog which blanketed the bay, and of which, as a landsman, I had little apprehension.
The tenth afternoon there was a falling swell and a thick, wet, white fog that hid one end of the brig from the other.
On Thursday the wind dropped, and a thick gray fog brooded over the land as though hiding the mysteries of the transformations that were being wrought in nature.
Neither wind nor sun, however, favoured Staple Inn one December afternoon towards six o'clock, when it was filled with fog, and candles shed murky and blurred rays through the windows of all its then-occupied sets of chambers; notably from a set of chambers in a corner house in the little inner quadrangle, presenting in black and white over its ugly portal the mysterious inscription: