focus

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bring something into focus

 
1. Lit. to make something seen through lenses sharply visible. I adjusted the binoculars until I brought the bird sharply into focus. The flowers were brought into focus by adjusting the controls.
2. Fig. to make something clear and understandable. I think we will have a better discussion of the problem if you will say a few words to bring it more sharply into focus. Please try to bring your major point into focus earlier in the essay.
See also: bring, focus

focus on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to aim and adjust a lens (including the lens in the eye) onto someone or something. I focused on the flower and pressed the shutter release. I focused on Fred and snapped just as he moved.
2. Fig. to dwell on the subject of someone or something. Let's focus on the question of the electric bill, if you don't mind. Let us focus on Fred and discuss his progress.
See also: focus, on

focus something on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to aim a lens at someone or something and adjust the lens for clarity. I focused the binoculars on the bird and stood there in awe at its beauty. He focused the camera on Jane and snapped the shutter.
2. Fig. to direct attention to someone or something. Could we please focus the discussion on the matter at hand for a few moments? Let's focus our attention on Tom and discuss his achievements so far.
See also: focus, on

*in focus

 
1. Lit. [of an image] seen clearly and sharply. (*Typically: be ~; come [into] ~; get [into] ~; get something [into] ~.) I have the slide in focus and can see the bacteria clearly.
2. Lit. [for optics, such as lenses, or an optical device, such as a microscope] to be aligned to allow something to be seen clearly and sharply. I've adjusted the telescope; Mars is now in focus.
3. Fig. [of problems, solutions, appraisals of people or things] perceived or understood clearly. (*Typically: be ~; get [into] ~; get something [into] ~.) Now that things are in focus, I feel better about the world.
See also: focus

*out of focus

blurred or fuzzy; seen indistinctly. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; go ~.) What I saw through the binoculars was sort of out of focus. The scene was out of focus.
See also: focus, of, out

focus on

v.
1. To orient or adjust something toward some particular point or thing: I focused the camera on the car across the street.
2. To direct someone or something at a particular point or purpose: The company director wanted to focus the staff's attention on finding a solution to the problem.
3. To be directed at some particular point or purpose: The manager focused on the sales force's performance.
See also: focus, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Leica has partially overcome the faults of the knob focuser by using two knobs: one that focuses more quickly and a second for fine tuning.
The focuser at top uses two knobs: one for gross focus, and one for fine, The Leica is fog-proof and waterproof.
Meade 12" Optical Tube Assembly -- Hughes Network Systems (OTA) and 647 Flip Mirror System DirecWay Satellite Internet System -- Software Bisque Paramount -- Optec Temperature Compensating GT-1100S Telescope Mount Focuser -- Santa Barbara Instrument Group -- ApogeeInc.
Recently I was commissioned by the York Astronomical Society to design and build a very large Crayford focuser for their 300mm aperture reflector.
The focuser is multi-purpose as various tubes carrying different pieces of apparatus had to be interchanged during observing sessions; there are no focusers in the commercial field which are capable of this facility, but my focusers are.
Converting the camera lens to an eyepiece was a relatively straightforward job, that even the most incompetent DIYer (like myself) was able to perform; it simply required fixing a suitable barrel to the lens in order to connect it to the (Crayford) focuser.
We can help collimate (align the mirrors) and tune up focusers, finders, etc.
3, a document that focusers on short term government solutions supporting the existing biofuels industry, as well as accelerating the commercial establishment of advanced biofuels and a viable long-term market by transforming how the federal government does business across departments and using strategic public-private partnerships.
The restructure focusers on three areas--brand marketing, innovation and intelligence and channel marketing--headed by marketing director Phil Rumbol.