flying


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Related to flying: flying squirrel, flying machine

flying visit

An exceptionally brief visit. We went for a flying visit to my mother's house before continuing on our way to the beach.
See also: flying, visit

come through (something) with flying colors

To win, achieve, or accomplish something exceptionally well or very successfully. Said especially of a test, examination, or training of some kind. Primarily heard in US. Samantha was rather nervous taking her final exam, but she came through with flying colors! Your brother has come through his apprenticeship with flying colors. He'll be a master builder in no time!
See also: color, come, flying

pass (something) with flying colours

To win, achieve, or accomplish something exceptionally well or very successfully. Said especially of a test, examination, or training of some kind. Primarily heard in UK. Samantha was rather nervous taking her final exam, but she passed with flying colours! Your brother passed his apprenticeship with flying colours. He'll be a master builder in no time!
See also: colour, flying, pass

fly beneath (the/someone's) radar

To go without being noticed, detected, or addressed. A: "Have you heard this band's latest album?" B: "I didn't even know it was out, it must have flown beneath my radar." Every year, the government promises to do something about the homelessness problem, yet every year it seems to fly beneath the radar.
See also: beneath, fly, radar

fly under (the/someone's) radar

To go without being noticed, detected, or addressed. A: "Have you heard this band's latest album?" B: "I didn't even know it was out, it must have flown under my radar." Every year, the government promises to do something about the homelessness problem, yet every year it seems to fly under the radar again.
See also: fly, radar

fly by the seat of (one's) pants

To rely on one's instinct, as opposed to acting according to a set plan. I really don't know how to operate this thing, I'm just flying by the seat of my pants here. You can't just fly by the seat of your pants, Jenna—please give your future some serious thought.
See also: fly, of, pant, seat

fly in the face of

To be or act in clear opposition to something else. I can't believe you said something so awful. It flies in the face of everything we stand for! Don't quit now, that just flies in the face of all your hard work.
See also: face, fly, of

fly in the teeth of

To be or act in clear opposition to something else. I can't believe you said something so awful. It flies in the teeth of everything we stand for! Don't quit now, that just flies in the teeth of all your hard work.
See also: fly, of, teeth

Flying Dutchman

A name that can apply either to a legendary ship, whose ghostly wreckage is said to be sometimes seen in times of bad weather near the Cape of Good Hope, or to the captain of this ship, who must sail until Judgment Day. I swear, I saw the Flying Dutchman during that last storm. Every time I take out my boat, I'm reminded of the Flying Dutchman, and how he is doomed to sail the seas until kingdom come.
See also: flying

flying fish

A type of fish that has winglike fins that allow it to glide above the water after it leaps into the air. Those flying fish soaring above the water are just about the craziest thing I've ever seen.
See also: fish, flying

fly in the face of someone or something

 and fly in the teeth of someone or something
Fig. to challenge someone or something; to go against someone or something. This idea flies in the face of everything we know about matter and energy. You had better not fly in the face of the committee.
See also: face, fly, of

flying high

 
1. Fig. very successful in one's ambitions; in an important or powerful position. (Often with the implication that this is not the usual situation or will change.) The government is flying high just now, but wait until the budget is announced. He's flying high these days, but he comes from a very poor family.
2. Fig. in a state of euphoria. (From good news, success, or drugs.) Wow! Todd is really flying high. Did he discover a gold mine? Sally is flying high. What's she on?
See also: flying, high

get something off the ground

 
1. Lit. to get something into the air. I'll announce the weather to the passengers as soon as we get the plane off the ground. I hope they get this plane off the ground soon.
2. Fig. to get something started. (Alludes to an airplane beginning a flight.) When we get this event off the ground we can relax. It is my job to get the celebration plans off the ground.
See also: get, ground, off

keep the stork flying

 and keep the stork busy
Rur. to have lots of children. Sally's pregnant again, with their sixth. They sure do keep the stork flying! Grandma and grandpa kept the stork flying. I've got ten aunts and uncles.
See also: flying, keep, stork

*off to a flying start

Fig. having a very successful beginning to something. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) The new business got off to a flying start with those export orders. We shall need a large donation from the local citizens if the charity is to get off to a flying start.
See also: flying, off, start

with flying colors

Cliché easily and excellently. John passed his geometry test with flying colors. Sally qualified for the race with flying colors.
See also: color, flying

with flying colors

with great success She took a driving test and passed with flying colors. My brother always managed to get through his courses, although not always with flying colors.
Etymology: based on the small and colorful flags flown (hung in the wind) on boats and ships in a race or when coming into port
See also: color, flying

fly in the face of something

to be the opposite of what is usual or accepted His decision to start his own business certainly flies in the face of good judgment.
See also: face, fly, of

flying high

1. doing very well All those companies were flying high at first, and next thing you knew they had all crashed to the ground.
2. to be very excited or happy He just heard that he got the scholarship and is really flying high.
See also: flying, high

get something off the ground

to start Casey and his friend tried to start a band, but it never got off the ground. A lot more money will be needed to get this project off the ground.
Etymology: based on the idea of an aircraft getting off the ground (starting a flight)
See also: get, ground, off

send somebody/something flying

to cause someone or something to move very quickly An explosion rocked the building, sending him flying into a desk.
See also: flying, send

off to a flying start

beginning very well This year he's off to a flying start, playing very well and winning his first five games.
See also: flying, off, start

fly in the face of something

  (slightly formal)
to be the opposite of what is usual or accepted These recommendations fly in the face of previous advice on safe limits for alcohol consumption.
See also: face, fly, of

be flying high

 
1. if a person or a company is flying high, they are very successful The company was flying high as a maker of personal computers.
2. (American informal) to be very excited or happy, often because of the effect of drugs The guy was on drugs - flying high and scaring everyone around him. When the winter Olympics came to Canada, the whole country was flying high.
See also: flying, high

come through/pass with flying colours

  (British & Australian) also come through/pass with flying colors (American & Australian)
to pass an examination with a very high score or to complete a difficult activity very successfully She took her university entrance exam in December and passed with flying colours. The officer training was gruelling, but he came through with flying colours.
See also: colour, come, flying

get off to a flying start

to begin an activity very successfully Maria got off to a flying start in her new job. With several customers on the books already, Tim's new business had got off to a flying start.
See also: flying, get, off, start

get (something) off the ground

if a plan or activity gets off the ground or you get it off the ground, it starts or succeeds The scheme should get off the ground towards the end of this year. A lot more public spending will be required to get this project off the ground.
See also: get, ground, off

kite-flying

  (British & Australian)
the act of telling people about an idea or plan so that you can find out what they think about it Mr Baker's hint about US intervention in the war was undoubtedly an exercise in kite-flying.
See fly a kite, Go fly a kite!

flying start

see under get off the ground.
See also: flying, start

fly in the face of

Also, fly in the teeth of. Act in direct opposition to or defiance of. For example, This decision flies in the face of all precedent, or They went out without permission, flying in the teeth of house rules. This metaphoric expression alludes to a physical attack. [Mid-1500s]
See also: face, fly, of

get off the ground

Make a start, get underway, as in Because of legal difficulties, the construction project never got off the ground. This expression, alluding to flight, dates from the mid-1900s. The similar-sounding get off to a flying start, meaning "make a successful start," alludes not to flight but to a quick start in a race, a usage from the late 1800s. For example, He's off to a flying start with his dissertation.
See also: get, ground, off

send flying

Cause to be knocked or scattered about, as in She bumped into the table and sent all the papers flying. This somewhat hyperbolic idiom was first recorded in 1789.
See also: flying, send

with flying colors, pass with

Also, come through with flying colors. Win, succeed, as in She came through the bar exam with flying colors. This expression alludes to a victorious ship sailing with its flags high. [Late 1600s]
See also: flying, pass

flying-fuck

1. n. a real or imaginary act of copulation where the male leaps or dives onto and into the female. (Usually objectionable.) The movie showed some jerk allegedly performing a flying-fuck, just for laughs.
2. and french-fried-fuck n. something totally worthless. (Usually objectionable.) Who gives a flying-fuck anyway? I wouldn’t give you a french-fried-fuck for all the crummy cars like that in the world.

with flying colors

mod. flamboyantly; boldly. Paul came home with flying colors after the match.
See also: color, flying

with flying colors

With complete or outstanding success: passed the exam with flying colors.
See also: color, flying

send flying

Informal
To cause to be knocked or scattered about with force: a blow to the table that sent the dishes flying.
See also: flying, send
References in periodicals archive ?
At airshows, Dawson is frequently asked what it's like to be a woman flying a plane men flew during the war.
Air Mobility Command on any given day, to include the activities in the AOR, are flying about 1,000 sorties worldwide.
A retired surgeon and director of North Jersey Bank who recently got his license, Jerry credits flying his Robinson R44 with taking years off his life.
Flying the CH-46E Sea Knight, supplies assault transport of combat troops in the initial assault waves and follow-on stages of amphibious and subsequent ashore operations.
Dale himself began flying gliders at the age of 14 in England before joining the Royal Air Force.
The new transport is receiving high marks from the pilots flying it.
Made of ripstop nylon and a fiberglass frame, the 27" x 26" Power Flyer[TM] rubber powered gliders are the latest in outdoor flying fun
Edwards pilots, who did not know what was happening on the ground, made two low passes over the park prior to flying over the parade.
I was totally disappointed that I was flying a bomber instead of a fighter.
Parker, chairman of Parker Price Venture Capital in San Francisco, will get almost as much enjoyment out of flying to the central Oregon resort as he will unwinding once he gets there.
The first Marine strikes of the war launches on 3 august, with VMF-214 sending eight F4U Corsairs flying close air support (CAS) for U.
Just before an insect larva changes into a flying adult, it develops white globs of cells called imaginal disks that later become its wings, explains Sean B.
In honor of the 100-year anniversary of the Wright brothers' first flight, Young Eagles pilots across the country plan to treat one million kids (ages 8-17) to free flights by the year 2003--and let the kids do the flying.
SEATTLE -- The Flying Heritage Collection, featuring rare World War II and Cold War-era aircraft acquired and restored to flying condition by investor and philanthropist Paul G.