flutter

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a flutter in the dovecote

A stir or mild disturbance among a certain organization or group of people, especially one that is typically quiet, reserved, or conservative in nature. Likened to domestic pigeons fluttering their wings in response to an agitation (a dovecote being a structure built to house and raise them). The unexpected entrance of an exuberant young woman caused a bit of a flutter in the dovecote at the old Men's Only club.
See also: dovecote, flutter

flutter the dovecote

To cause a stir or mild disturbance among a certain organization or group of people, especially one that is typically quiet, reserved, or conservative in nature. Likened to domestic pigeons fluttering their wings in response to an agitation (a dovecote being a structure built to house and raise them). The exuberant young woman fluttered the dovecote of the old Men's Only club by bursting in unannounced.
See also: dovecote, flutter

in a flutter

In a nervous, confused, or agitated state. We were all in a flutter waiting to meet the President at our school rally. The economy is still in a flutter after news that the country's largest corporation has filed for bankruptcy.
See also: flutter

flutter about

 and flutter around 
1. Lit. to fly about with quick, flapping motions of the wings. The moths fluttered about aimlessly. A few birds fluttered around.
2. Fig. [for someone] to move about quickly and busily. Aunt Margaret fluttered about, picking up after everyone. Stop fluttering around and sit down!
See also: flutter

flutter about something

 and flutter around something 
1. Lit. to fly around something or some place. The moths were fluttering about the lightbulb. The butterflies fluttered around the bright flowers.
2. Fig. to keep moving busily within a particular place. The maid fluttered about the house, dusting and arranging. She fluttered around the house from room to room.
See also: flutter

flutter down

[for flying or falling things] to flap or float downward. The butterflies fluttered down onto the flowers. The leaves fluttered down from the trees when the breeze blew.
See also: down, flutter

flutter over someone or something

to fly or flap above someone or something. (Also said of a person being fussy about someone or something.) The little moths fluttered over us while we were in the garden. The birds flutter over the fountain, eager for a bath.
See also: flutter

in a dither

confused; nervous; bothered. Mary is sort of in a dither lately. Don't get yourself in a dither.
See also: dither

in a dither

Also, all of a dither; in a flutter or tizzy . In a state of tremulous agitation, as in Planning the wedding put her in a dither, or He tried to pull himself together, but he was all of a dither, or She showed up in such a flutter that our meeting was useless. The noun dither dates from the early 1800s and goes back to the Middle English verb didderen, "to tremble"; in a flutter dates from the mid-1700s; in a tizzy dates from about 1930 and is of uncertain origin.
See also: dither

in a dither

mod. confused; undecided. Don’t get yourself in a dither.
See also: dither
References in periodicals archive ?
Atrial flutter is a common complication late after atrial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries.
A-16-year old boy with a history of surgical palliation of d-transposition of the great arteries, a normal systolic ejection fraction, and symptomatic drug refractory atrial flutter was referred for an electrophysiological study and ablation procedure.
An atrial flutter with a 214 ms cycle length and 2:1 AV conduction ratio was recorded.
These flutters can range from bothersome to terrifying, but aren't usually serious.
Hormonal cycles in women or changes in hormonal therapy may be associated with heart skips or flutters, as well as chest pain.
Both play two to three times a week at Hinckley's Flutters Club.
A north doctor has dismissed fears that Tony Blair's heart flutter could be linked to stress.
Consultant cardiologist at the Newcastle Freeman Hospital, Dr Rod Bexton explained the atrial flutter ablation ( an irregular heart beat condition ( affects a number of people and is worsened only by caffeine, cigarettes or alcohol.
McCreevy, who was slammed for his recent Scrooge budget, said he wouldn't be having a flutter but still had his binoculars handy to follow the action.
A keen observer who figured out how the scattering of light makes the sky blue, Rayleigh attributed flag flutter to the interplay between deformations of a flag's surface and subtle gusting of the wind.
As of yesterday, two flutters were posted on tomorrow's Premiership game between Arsenal and Chelsea, of which one was for Chelsea to win or draw, offered by `simon' at odds of evens to a stake of pounds 20.
There is a limit of 50 flutters per month for the weak-willed, and the pounds 100 stake limit for any bet.
And for anyone who fancies a flutter, Pol's lucky pecks for next week's draw are 1, 13, 24, 33, 36 and 45.
They warned trainer Paul Wood that Roses Flutter could be referred to the stewards of the Jockey Club if behaving in similar fashion again.