flung


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

fling mud

To disparage someone, especially to the detriment of their reputation. I'm trying to maintain a fair and respectable campaign, and my opponent has no problem flinging mud!
See also: fling, mud

fling (someone or something) aside

To toss or shove someone or something out of one's path. Dad flung my toys aside and scolded me for not cleaning up like he'd asked me to.
See also: aside, fling

fling away

1. To toss someone or something out of one's path. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "away." Dad flung my toys away and scolded me for not cleaning up like he'd asked me to.
2. To discard or reject someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "away." Did you really put these drawings in the trash? Sheesh, it's like you're trying to fling away my childhood! I know she drives you nuts, but she's your mother—you'll never be able to fling her away.
See also: away, fling

fling back

1. To toss or throw someone or something backwards. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "back." The force of the explosion flung us all back.
2. To return something to someone or some place by tossing or throwing it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "back." Our neighbor wasn't happy when we hit the ball into his yard, but at least he flung it back.
See also: back, fling

fling (someone or something) down

To toss or shove someone or something down. The bully flung the skinny boy down and threated to hit him if he didn't part with his lunch money.
See also: down, fling

fling (one's) head back

To move one's head backwards in a swift motion. I flung my head back to shake the hair out of my eyes.
See also: back, fling, head

fling in

To throw or toss something into something else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "in." Hey, open that drawer and fling these paper clips in, will you? I'm trying to clear off this table.
See also: fling

fling (something) into (something)

To throw or toss something into something else. Hey, fling these paper clips into the drawer, will you? I'm trying to clear off this table.
See also: fling

fling off (of) (someone or something)

To pull or jerk something off of someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "off." With a squeal, she flung off the fly that had landed on her arm. I pulled the blankets up over my head, but Mom just flung them off of me, yelling that it was time to get up.
See also: fling, off

fling off

To quickly push or pull something off of oneself. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "off." Ugh, once Mom came in, yelling that I had to get up, I had no choice but to fling the blankets off and finally get out of bed. As usual, Holly immediately started complaining about how hot it was in the house and flung off her sweater
See also: fling, off

fling on

To quickly dress oneself in an article of clothing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "on." A: "But I'm in my pajamas!" B: "Oh, just fling on any old thing and come meet us at the bar!" When I saw our dog slip through the fence, I flung on my coat and ran outside in my slippers to catch him.
See also: fling, on

fling out of (something)

To toss or throw something out of something else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fling" and "out." The baby's driving me crazy today—she just keeps flinging all of her toys out of the toy box. The living room looks like a bomb went off! Ariel is inconsolable right now because she flung her favorite doll out of the stroller this afternoon, and now, we can't find it.
See also: fling, of, out

fling up (one's) hands

To toss or jerk one's hands upward, typically to convey some emotion. As the kids ran around the room shrieking, Mom just flung up her hands and shook her head. I can't hear what they're saying, but it looks like Dad just flung up his hands in anger, so that's not a good sign.
See also: fling, hand, up

fling up (one's) arms

To toss or jerk one's arms upward, typically to convey some emotion. As the kids ran around the room shrieking, Mom just flung up her arms and shook her head. I can't hear what they're saying, but it looks like Dad just flung up his arms in anger, so that's not a good sign.
See also: arm, fling, up

fling (one's) hands up

To toss or jerk one's hands upward, typically to convey some emotion. As the kids ran around the room shrieking, Mom just flung her hands up and shook her head. I can't hear what they're saying, but it looks like Dad just flung his hands up in anger, so that's not a good sign.
See also: fling, hand, up

fling (one's) arms up

To toss or jerk one's arms upward, typically to convey some emotion. As the kids ran around the room shrieking, Mom just flung her arms up and shook her head. I can't hear what they're saying, but it looks like Dad just flung his arms up in anger, so that's not a good sign.
See also: arm, fling, up

fling up

slang To vomit. Geez, I thought I was going to fling up on that boat—I felt so seasick!
See also: fling, up

fling up (one's) hands in (some emotion)

To toss or jerk one's hands upward to convey some emotion. As the kids ran around the room shrieking, Mom just flung up her hands in exhaustion and shook her head. I can't hear what they're saying, but it looks like Dad just flung up his hands up in anger, so that's not a good sign.
See also: fling, hand, up

fling up (one's) arms in (some emotion)

To toss or jerk one's arms upward to convey some emotion. As the kids ran around the room shrieking, Mom just flung up her arms in exhaustion and shook her head. I can't hear what they're saying, but it looks like Dad just flung up his arms in anger, so that's not a good sign.
See also: arm, fling, up

fling (one's) hands up in (some emotion)

To toss or jerk one's hands upward to convey some emotion. As the kids ran around the room shrieking, Mom just flung her hands up in exhaustion and shook her head. I can't hear what they're saying, but it looks like Dad just flung his hands up in anger, so that's not a good sign.
See also: fling, hand, up

fling (one's) arms up in (some emotion)

To toss or jerk one's arms upward to convey some emotion. As the kids ran around the room shrieking, Mom just flung her arms up in exhaustion and shook her head. I can't hear what they're saying, but it looks like Dad just flung his arms up in anger, so that's not a good sign.
See also: arm, fling, up

fling someone or something away

to throw or sling someone or something away or out of the way. You can't just fling me away! I am your eldest son! You can't just fling away the things you don't want!
See also: away, fling

fling someone or something back

 
1. to sling or throw someone or something backwards. I had to fling the child back, away from the fire. I flung back the door and ran out. Walt grabbed at the door and flung it back.
2. to return someone or something by slinging or throwing. She took the little fish and flung it back into the water. Did you fling back the ball to Roger?
See also: back, fling

fling something in(to) something

 and fling something in
to throw something into something. I will fling this thing in the trash. It is junk! Liz opened the laundry chute and flung in her clothes. She flung them in.
See also: fling

fling something off (of) something

 and fling something off
to yank or pull something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) He flung the bedspread off the bed and dived in. He flung off the covers and dived into bed.
See also: fling, off

fling something up (in something)

to throw one's arms or hands up in an expression of some emotion, such as despair, horror, disgust, resignation. She flung her hands up in despair. She flung up her hands and cried out for help.
See also: fling, up

fling up

Sl. to empty one's stomach; to vomit. I was afraid I was going to fling up. Who flung up on the sidewalk?
See also: fling, up

fling (or sling or throw) mud

make disparaging or scandalous remarks or accusations. informal
The proverb throw dirt (or mud) enough, and some will stick , to which this phrase alludes, is attributed to the Florentine statesman Niccolò Machiavelli ( 1469–1527 ).
See also: fling, mud

fling up

in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. I was afraid I was going to fling up.
See also: fling, up
References in periodicals archive ?
True, Benazir Bhutto didn't drown in a bath-tub, but Zardari must have sympathized with another man whose wife's death caused unfortunate accusations to be flung around.
People hailed the government for development schemes done in the far flung areas.
The committee said, in far flung areas of Balochistan women brought water from a distance of 5 kilometers, while a water pipeline could be established in a short budget.
MANILA, Philippines The nationality of the potential third player to break the "duopoly" in the country's telecommunication industry is not a cause of concern for the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI), but the country's largest business organization wants to be assured whoever is chosen will be able to significantly improve mobile and internet services, particularly in far flung areas.
And pal Faith Paine, 18, who was on the ride at the time, said: "She was flung about like a rag doll and was foaming at the mouth.
A video of a baby being flung from a mini-van has gone viral after a horrific car crash in Russia nearly took the child's life.
You can see her work in Gatehouse of Fleet when the Fling is flung open on June 2 for four days.
A YOUNG woman died in a hospital intensive care unit hours after being flung from a dune buggy on a beach.
Smooth and fling me now with what you flung before.
1 : to throw hard or without care <She flung the junk out the window.
The differences turned so bitter that Rajesh flung the bag containing the jewellery, reportedly worth Rs80,000 (Dh6,150), into a drain.
AN FA Cup loser's medal which was flung into the crowd before Cardiff City lifted the trophy in 1927 has been uncovered.
A MOTORIST who was flung yards from his car and found dead under a hedge had not been wearing a seat belt, an inquest heard yesterday.
The jockey got up and flung his whip at the horse, striking it on the hind quarters as it galloped off.