fling

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fling (one's) bonnet over the windmill

To act in a deranged, reckless, or unconventional manner. Refers to the eponymous character of the novel Don Quixote, who tosses his hat over a windmill (which he imagines is a giant) as a challenge to it. Sarah is always trying to buck social conventions, flinging her bonnet over the windmill whenever possible. I know you like to take risks in business, but don't fling your bonnet over the windmill.
See also: bonnet, fling, windmill

fling (one's) cap over the windmill

To act in a deranged, reckless, or unconventional manner. Refers to the eponymous character of the novel Don Quixote, who tosses his hat over a windmill (which he imagines is a giant) as a challenge to it. Sarah is always trying to buck social conventions, flinging her cap over the windmill whenever possible. I know you like to take risks in business, but don't fling your cap over the windmill.
See also: cap, fling, windmill

fling (one's) hat over the windmill

To act in a deranged, reckless, or unconventional manner. Refers to the eponymous character of the novel Don Quixote, who tosses his hat over a windmill (which he imagines is a giant) as a challenge to it. Sarah is always trying to buck social conventions, flinging her hat over the windmill whenever possible. I know you like to take risks in business, but don't fling your hat over the windmill.
See also: fling, hat, windmill

have a fling (with someone)

To have a brief, noncommittal sexual relationship (with someone). I had a few flings in college, but it was only after I graduated that I started having any serious relationships. The professor lost her job for having a fling with one of her students.
See also: fling, have

final fling

Fig. the last act or period of enjoyment before a change in one's circumstances or lifestyle. You might as well have a final fling before the baby's born. Mary's going out with her girlfriends for a final fling. She's getting married next week.
See also: final, fling

fling one's head back

to tilt one's head back quickly. She flung her head back and laughed heartily. She flung back her head and laughed.
See also: back, fling, head

fling someone or something around

to sling or throw someone or something around. Don't fling your wet clothing around. You are messing up the whole room. Don't fling around all your clothes.
See also: around, fling

fling someone or something aside

to toss or sling someone or something aside or out of the way. She flung aside the covers and leaped out of bed. She flung the covers aside.
See also: aside, fling

fling someone or something away

to throw or sling someone or something away or out of the way. You can't just fling me away! I am your eldest son! You can't just fling away the things you don't want!
See also: away, fling

fling someone or something back

 
1. to sling or throw someone or something backwards. I had to fling the child back, away from the fire. I flung back the door and ran out. Walt grabbed at the door and flung it back.
2. to return someone or something by slinging or throwing. She took the little fish and flung it back into the water. Did you fling back the ball to Roger?
See also: back, fling

fling someone or something down

to throw or push someone or something down. He flung the book down in great anger. He flung down the book and ran from the room.
See also: down, fling

fling someone or something out of something

 and fling someone or something out
to sling or throw someone or some thing out of something or some place. In anger, she flung the cat out of the window. She flung out the cat and closed the window.
See also: fling, of, out

fling something at someone or something

to throw something roughly or carelessly at someone or something. Don't fling that towel at me! Don't just fling that paper at the wastebasket, hoping it will get there!
See also: fling

fling something in(to) something

 and fling something in
to throw something into something. I will fling this thing in the trash. It is junk! Liz opened the laundry chute and flung in her clothes. She flung them in.
See also: fling

fling something off of oneself

 and fling something off 
1. to pull or throw something off of oneself hastily. She flung the blanket off herself. She flung off the blanket.
2. to pull or take off an article of clothing. Larry flung his jacket off and went straight to the kitchen. He flung off his jacket.
See also: fling, of, off

fling something off (of) something

 and fling something off
to yank or pull something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) He flung the bedspread off the bed and dived in. He flung off the covers and dived into bed.
See also: fling, off

fling something on oneself

 and fling something on
to put an article of clothing onto oneself hastily. She got up and flung on her robe. She flung her robe on and went to answer the door.
See also: fling, on

fling something up in someone's face

Fig. to bring a problem up and confront someone with it. Don't fling it up in my face! It's not my fault! I don't like anyone to fling up my past in my face.
See also: face, fling, up

fling something up (in something)

to throw one's arms or hands up in an expression of some emotion, such as despair, horror, disgust, resignation. She flung her hands up in despair. She flung up her hands and cried out for help.
See also: fling, up

fling up

Sl. to empty one's stomach; to vomit. I was afraid I was going to fling up. Who flung up on the sidewalk?
See also: fling, up

throw oneself at someone

 and fling oneself at someone
Fig. to give oneself willingly to someone else for romance. I guess that Mary really likes John. She practically threw herself at him when he came into the room. Everyone could see by the way Tom flung himself at Jane that he was going to ask her for a date.
See also: throw

fling oneself at someone

Also, fling or throw oneself at someone's head . Try openly to make someone love one. For example, She was constantly phoning him and inviting him over, really flinging herself at him, or Mom said she should stop throwing herself at his head.
See also: fling

last fling

A final enjoyment of freedom. For example, He's planning to have one last fling before joining the army. This expression employs fling in the sense of "a brief period of indulging one's impulses," a usage dating from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: fling, last

throw oneself at

Also, throw oneself at someone's head. Try to attract someone's interest, attention, or love, as in He always had women throwing themselves at his head. [Late 1700s]
See also: throw

fling up

in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. I was afraid I was going to fling up.
See also: fling, up

fling-wing

n. a helicopter. The fling-wing from the radio station is hovering over the traffic jam.

throw oneself at

To make efforts to attract the interest or affection of (another).
See also: throw
References in classic literature ?
But, by a sort of dazzling miracle that sent him staggering, Raoul was suddenly flung back, while an icy blast swept over his face; he saw, not two, but four, eight, twenty Christines spinning round him, laughing at him and fleeing so swiftly that he could not touch one of them.
In a moment he had gripped me by the shoulder with a hand that was smeared red, had twisted me off my feet, and flung me headlong back into my own room.
And then a swift movement of the steamboat (she had suddenly come round to avoid being run down) flung him headlong from the seat upon which he was standing.
Out of a cobwebbed bottle, containing liquor that a royal Governor might have smacked his lips over, they quaffed healths to the King, and babbled treason to the Republic, feeling as if the protecting shadow of the throne were still flung around them.
He cut the boar's throat as he spoke, whereon Talthybius whirled it round his head, and flung it into the wide sea to feed the fishes.
You ought not to have come today," she said in an altered voice; and suddenly she turned, flung her arms about him and pressed her lips to his.
shouted the doctor in his sonorous, ringing voice, as he flung out the ladder, the lowest ratlines of which tossed up the dust of the road.
He rose to his feet, flung aside the straw pallet upon the street urchins, and fled.
The shawl that was flung over her - we had not begun to hunt her with a shawl, nor to make our bodies a screen between her and the draughts, nor to creep into her room a score of times in the night to stand looking at her as she slept.
The children were flung into it, four stout pirates raised it on their shoulders, the others fell in behind, and singing the hateful pirate chorus the strange procession set off through the wood.
She then flung her sash into a puddle and danced on it till dirty water was squirted over her frock, after which she climbed the fence and had a series of incredible adventures, one of the least of which was that she kicked off both her boots.
The swift current caught us, flung us toward the south shore, but before we could make a landing flung us back toward the north shore.
And at sound of the mate's voice the wild-dog flung quick-opened eyes in Jerry's direction and flashed into his burrow, where he immediately turned around, thrust his head out with a show of teeth, and snarled triumphant defiance.
He tugged at his coat pocket and flung a thin volume on the table.
Flung out with such force as to be smashed against the near end of the cage, Michael fell to the floor, tried to spring up, but crumpled and sank down, his right shoulder streaming blood from a terrible mauling and crushing.