flown


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Related to flown: past participle

fly beneath (the/someone's) radar

To go without being noticed, detected, or addressed. A: "Have you heard this band's latest album?" B: "I didn't even know it was out, it must have flown beneath my radar." Every year, the government promises to do something about the homelessness problem, yet every year it seems to fly beneath the radar.
See also: beneath, fly, radar

fly under (the/someone's) radar

To go without being noticed, detected, or addressed. A: "Have you heard this band's latest album?" B: "I didn't even know it was out, it must have flown under my radar." Every year, the government promises to do something about the homelessness problem, yet every year it seems to fly under the radar again.
See also: fly, radar

fly a kite

1. To suggest something in order to gauge interest in it or others' perception of it. When everyone objected to my idea, I reassured them that I was just flying a kite and had not made any sort of decision on the matter.
2. To ponder a potential reason or explanation for something. Oh, you're just flying a kite—you don't really know why Emily didn't come to the party.
See also: fly, kite

fly the flag

To stand up for, support, or defend someone or something. A number of people from the actor's hometown are coming to New York to fly the flag at his debut performance on Broadway. My country is often a target for insults or gibes abroad, so whenever I go traveling I make a point of flying the flag for it.
See also: flag, fly

the bird has flown

Someone or something has left, fled, escaped, etc.; someone or something is no longer here. I'm afraid you're not going to find him here. The bird has flown.
See also: bird, flown

bird has flown, the

The individual sought has gone away, as in Jean hoped to meet her editor at long last, but when she arrived the bird had flown. This idiom has been used for an escaped prisoner, and more generally, as in 1655 by William Gurnall ( The Christian in Complete Armour): "Man ... knows not his time ... he comes when the bird is flown." [Mid-1600s]
See also: bird

the bird has flown

If you say the bird has flown, you mean that the person you are looking for has escaped or disappeared. He'd been told to follow the woman to work and wait till she came out again. Instead he'd wandered off, come back at her normal leaving time and found the bird had flown.
See also: bird, flown

fly the flag

COMMON
1. If you fly the flag for your country or a group to which you belong, you represent it or do something to support it. I would love to fly the flag for Britain and win the Eurovision Song Contest. Note: Verbs such as carry, show or wave are sometimes used instead of fly. The Kuwaiti team said they were only in Peking to show the flag. He believed in the sacred power of great music: he felt that he was carrying the flag of high culture.
2. If you fly the flag for something, you support it and praise it. Wragg was left to fly the flag for state education. Note: Verbs such as carry, show or wave are sometimes used instead of fly. I think it's important that we wave the flag for the arts.
See also: flag, fly

the bird has flown

the person you are looking for has escaped or gone away.
See also: bird, flown

fly the flag

1 (of a ship) be registered to a particular country and sail under its flag. 2 represent or demonstrate support for your country, political party, or organization, especially when you are abroad.
In sense 2, the forms show the flag , carry the flag , and wave the flag are also found.
2 1996 Hello! She flew the flag for British tennis in the Eighties.
See also: flag, fly

fly a kite

try something out to test opinion. informal
A historical sense of this phrase was ‘raise money by an accommodation bill’, meaning to raise money on credit, and this sense of testing public opinion of your creditworthiness gave rise to the current figurative sense. The US phrase go fly a kite! means ‘go away!’.
See also: fly, kite

the bird has ˈflown

the person who was being chased or looked for has escaped or gone away: The police raided the house at dawn, but the bird had flown.
See also: bird, flown

fly a ˈkite

(British English, informal) release a bit of information, etc. in order to test public reaction to something that you plan to do at a later date: Let’s fly a kite. Tell the papers that the government is thinking of raising the school leaving age to 18, and we’ll see what the reaction is.
A kite is a kind of toy that you fly in the air at the end of one or more long strings. It will tell you which way the wind is blowing.
See also: fly, kite
References in periodicals archive ?
We proved that the unstable wing configuration can be flown.
In 1990, Pestana entered a painting of a T-38, a trainer aircraft he had flown for a couple of years, into the Air Force Artist-Craftsman contest.
From the garage at their home within sight of the Mojave Airport, the Kreighs sell radio-controlled aircraft designed to be flown indoors, shipping aircraft kits and associated parts throughout the world.
The airplane was flown Tuesday and Wednesday at Edwards Air Force Base and spent Thursday at Fox Field in Lancaster.
Scoring was based on the quality of the design report, oral presentation, engineering/technical inspection, and flying performance,maximum payload flown and actual versus predicted payload.
He has 11,000 hours of flying time and has flown 125 different aircraft.
Hinds has flown for more than 12,000 hours in 70 different types of aircraft, including bombers, fighters, spy planes and cargo aircraft.