flood

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be in floods (of tears)

To be crying often or excessively. Ever since her father died, Beth has been in floods of tears.
See also: flood

be in full flood

1. Literally, to be overflowing, as of a river or similar body of water. Thanks to all the rain we've had this spring, the river is in full flood.
2. To be well underway and continuing at a fast pace. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell mom because her planning is already in full flood. After a slow start, the convention is now in full flood.
See also: flood, full

flood the market

To become available in large numbers, often for low prices. Don't get one of those cheap phones that seem to be flooding the market these days.
See also: flood, market

in full flood

1. Happening or being undertaken at a fast pace or with a lot of vigor and enthusiasm. Primarily heard in UK. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell mom because her planning is already in full flood. Campaigns for both sides are now in full flood ahead of the May election.
2. Of speech, fluently, quickly, and at great length. Primarily heard in UK. After a couple of drinks during dinner, my uncle was in full flood about his position on immigration.
See also: flood, full

in full flow

1. Happening or being undertaken at a fast pace or with a lot of vigor and enthusiasm. Primarily heard in UK. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell mom because her planning is already in full flow. Campaigns for both sides are now in full flow ahead of the May election.
2. Of speech, fluently, quickly, and at great length. Primarily heard in UK. After a couple of drinks during dinner, my uncle was in full flow about his position on immigration.
See also: flow, full

flood out

1. To move very quickly out of some place or thing. Despite the connotation of the word "flood," this usage is not limited to water. When our washer broke, water flooded out of the laundry room. Employees flooded out of the building at the sound of the fire alarm.
2. To cause someone or something to move from a place or thing due to a deluge of water. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "flood" and "out." The water main break flooded out all of the residents on that block.
See also: flood, out

flood in

 (to something)
1. Lit. [for a fluid] to flow quickly into something in great volume. The water flooded in and soaked the carpets.
2. Fig. [for large amounts or numbers or people or things] to pour or rush into something. The people flooded into the hall. We opened the door, and the dogs and cats flooded in.
See also: flood

flood out

 (of something)
1. Lit. [for water or something that flows] to rush out of something. The water flooded out of the break in the dam.
2. Fig. [for people] to rush out of something or some place. The people flooded out of the theater, totally disgusted with the performance.
See also: flood, out

flood someone or something out of something

 and flood someone or something out
[for too much water] to force someone or something to leave something or some place. The high waters flooded them out of their home. The high waters flooded out a lot of people.
See also: flood, of, out

flood someone or something with something

to cover or inundate someone or something with something. We flooded them with praise and carried them on our shoulders. The rains flooded the fields with standing water.
See also: flood

in full flow

BRITISH or

in full flood

COMMON
1. If an activity, or the person who is performing the activity, is in full flow or in full flood, the activity has started and is being done with a lot of energy and enthusiasm. When she's in full flow, she often works right through the night. To hear the drum and bass of the Barrett brothers in full flow is a real treat for long-time fans. A campaign of public accusation is now in full flood. Note: You can also say that someone or something is in full spate. With family life in full spate, there were nevertheless some times of quiet domesticity.
2. If someone is in full flow or in full flood, they are talking quickly and for a long time. A male voice was in full flow in the lounge. Vicki was in full flood on the subject of her last boyfriend, a fellow lawyer she'd met at a charity ball.
See also: flow, full

be in full flood

1 (of a river) be swollen and overflowing its banks. 2 have gained momentum; be at the height of activity.
2 1991 Journal of Theological Studies There is too much detail for comfort…which is somewhat confusing when exposition is in full flood.
See also: flood, full

in full flow

1 talking fluently and easily and showing no sign of stopping. 2 performing vigorously and enthusiastically.
See also: flow, full

ˌflood the ˈmarket

offer for sale large quantities of a product, often at a low price: Importers flooded the market with cheap toys just before Christmas.
See also: flood, market

be in ˈfloods (of ˈtears)

(informal) be crying a lot: She was in floods of tears after a row with her family.
See also: flood

flood out

v.
To force something out or away from some place due to a current or influx of water: The torrential rains flooded out most of the coastal residents. High tides regularly flood the smaller animals and insects out of spaces between the rocks. We were flooded out by the broken water line.
See also: flood, out
References in periodicals archive ?
A breakdown of the flooded properties by the Environment Agency revealed 52% were affected by a main river, 12% by surface water and 36% by flooding from ordinary watercourses.
Also dealing with a flooded garage was Linda Maeder, 56, of Sherman Oaks, who was picking up 10 sandbags with her partner Diane Fisher.
Miles' task was made even more difficult by a car stuck in the center of the flooded road.
Firefighters and police warned residents to stay clear of flooded roads and raging storm channels.
Do not drive or walk through flooded areas, and stay away from
Even with the widespread use of the flood safety education video, ``No Way Out,'' which features the cautionary tale of Adam Bischoff's death, children still manage to get swept away, and motorists, who are unwary of the dangers posed by flooded streets and low water crossings, end up getting stranded in quickly rising floodwaters.
Over the lifetime of a 30-year mortgage, there is a 26-percent chance of being flooded by a 100-year flood," the Task Force Report states.
While Metrolink fights the lawsuit by Gary and Debbie Moss, whose home was flooded in February, officials hired Elmore Pipe Jacking of Lake View Terrace to build a $135,000 culvert in the area.
For the first time, real estate owners will have access to information that helps them more accurately assess the likelihood of their properties being flooded, thanks to NationWide Flood Research, Inc.
Without proper drainage, runoff has typically flooded Sand Canyon Road and caused some access problems, Heidt said.
On April 13, 1992 the Chicago River flooded into an abandoned tunnel system, which connected most of the older buildings in the downtown area of Chicago.
Camarillo resident Margaret Kavanagh said water flooded into into her garage, a minor annoyance compared to others on her Mardigras Court cul-de-sac.
This prevents the target host from becoming flooded by these unresolved connection attempts, which causes the operating system, and the host, stop receiving new connections.
El Nino's assault Monday on Southern California flooded Antelope Valley streets and caused scattered power outages, but all told the area fared well - a tribute, officials said, to preseason planning and millions of dollars invested in drainage improvements.