flog

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flog the dolphin

vulgar slang Of a man, to masturbate.
See also: flog

flog the log

vulgar slang Of a man, to masturbate.
See also: flog, log

beat a dead horse

To continue to focus on something—especially an issue or topic—that is no longer of any use or relevance. We've all moved on from that problem, so there's no use beating a dead horse.
See also: beat, dead, horse

flog a dead horse

To continue to focus on something—especially an issue or topic—that is no longer of any use or relevance. We've all moved on from that problem, so there's no use flogging a dead horse.
See also: dead, flog, horse

flog (something) to death

To linger over or discuss something so long and to such a tedious and laborious extent that the subject is no longer of any interest or relevance. I think we should move on to another topic before we flog this one to death. The film's rhetorical message has been flogged to death by everyone you talk to.
See also: death, flog

flog a dead horse

 and beat a dead horse
Fig. to insist on talking about something that no one is interested in, or that has already been thoroughly discussed. The history teacher lectured us every day about the importance of studying history, until we begged him to stop flogging a dead horse. Jill: I think I'll write the company president another letter asking him to prohibit smoking. Jane: There's no use beating a dead horse, Jill; he's already decided to let people smoke.
See also: dead, flog, horse

flog someone to death

Lit. to beat someone to death with a whip. In the movie, the captain ordered the first mate to flog the sailor to death.
See also: death, flog

flog something to death

Fig. to dwell on something so much that it no longer has any interest. Stop talking about this! You've flogged it to death. Walter almost flogged the whole matter to death before we stopped him.
See also: death, flog

beat a dead horse

Also, flog a dead horse. Try to revive interest in a hopeless issue. For example, Politicians who favor the old single-tax idea are beating a dead horse. From the 1600s on the term dead horse was used figuratively to mean "something of no current value," specifically an advance in pay or other debt that had to be worked ("flogged") off. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: beat, dead, horse

work your guts out

or

flog your guts out

or

slog your guts out

INFORMAL
If you work your guts out, flog your guts out or slog your guts out, you work very hard. These women were amazing. They worked their guts out from 7.30 to 4.30 every day, often all evening and weekend too if they had families. I've been slogging my guts out for months, trying to get this project finished.
See also: gut, out, work

be flogging a dead horse

BRITISH or

be beating a dead horse

AMERICAN
If someone is flogging a dead horse, they are wasting their time trying to achieve something that cannot be done. After putting in all that hard work it feels like we're flogging a dead horse — it's all very discouraging. You're beating a dead horse on this. These guys are defeated.
See also: dead, flog, horse

flog a dead horse

waste energy on a lost cause or unalterable situation.
1971 Cabinet Maker & Retail Furnisher If this is the case, we are flogging a dead horse in still trying to promote the scheme.
See also: dead, flog, horse

ˌflog a dead ˈhorse

(British English, informal) waste your effort by trying to do something that is no longer possible: Pam’s flogging a dead horse trying to organize the theatre trip. It’s quite obvious that nobody’s interested.
If an animal or a person is flogged, it is/they are hit many times with a whip or a stick, usually as a punishment.
See also: dead, flog, horse

ˌflog something to ˈdeath

(British English, informal) talk/write about or deal with a subject so often that there is no longer any interest in it: The word ‘new’ has really been flogged to death in advertisements, and nobody believes it any more.
See also: death, flog, something

flog

(flɑg)
tv. to promote, hype, or support something; to try to sell something aggressively. Fred was flogging this car so hard, I figured he was trying to get rid of it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Flogger Todd has such a ring to it that it could not have sprung unbidden from Hilda's imagination.
I would like to go to Las Vegas and take part in their poker tournament with my side-kick Flogger, who thinks he's an on-line poker whizz.
He said: 'He's a hanger, he's a flogger, which always used to be regarded in the old days as the epitome of a right-wing Tory.
Otter's reading of White-Jacket focuses sharply--and uncomfortably--on scenes of brutal flogging, where "the flogger is represented as having the power to define and convert human skin" (51).
THE froth's been flying out of my TV screen since the riots as disciples of Draco foam that "something must be done" and what's wrong with a little hanging, drawing and quartering anyway, although it's hard to find a half-decent hanger, flogger and quarterer these days?
Thierry Henry - you remember, the bloke Gary Caldwell had in his back pocket last October - presented some made-up award for "Global Achievement" to fellow Pepsi flogger David Beckham.
Tony Blair's ill-conceived interventionist foreign policy in Yugoslavia,Afghanistan and Iraq has further encouraged minority groups in those countries to look towards the UK as a safe haven,and thus his self promotion as flogger of the immigration deluge stretches imagination and tests our credulity.
19 Which cheeky Cockney actor played Corporal Flogger Hoskins in the Army Game?
With regard to recent egard to recentmentions of the TV comedy The Army Game, can you please remind me who played the characters Cupcake, Professor, Flogger and Chubby?
Long-suffering Shelley, played by SALLY LINDSAY, will be choosing dresses and bridesmaids while Pete once more jumps into bed with the sexy flower flogger (KATY CARMICHAEL).
He bought a flogger, a leather stick, but there was no violence.
I'm not being mean but having conquered Paris, New York and Tokyo, expensive footwear flogger Jimmy Choo may not have put Inverness at the top of the list for his next shoe shop.
A valet for 20 years, Flogger went on his own four years ago, eking out a living with the travelling circus he knows so well.
Now, Bill, to all intents and purposes, is a hanger and flogger who prides himself on his days on the bench at Glasgow District Court.
Of Duncan Smith, he said: "He's a hanger, he's a flogger, which always used to be regarded in the old days as the epitome of a right-wing Tory.