flock


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birds of a feather

Similar or like-minded people. A shorthand version of the full proverb "birds of a feather flock together," meaning people who have similar interests, ideas, or characteristics tend to seek out and/or associate with one another. I knew you and John would get along well, you're birds of a feather, after all.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather flock together

People who have similar interests, ideas, or characteristics tend to seek out and/or associate with one another. I knew you and John would get along well since you both enjoy sci-fi. Birds of a feather flock together.
See also: bird, feather, flock, of, together

flower of the flock

The best person or thing in a group. Your cupcakes are just the flower of the flock—there is no better item at the bake sale. She's the best we've got, the flower of the flock, so you should absolutely put her on this case.
See also: flock, flower, of

flock after (someone or something)

To pursue or follow someone or something in large numbers. A: "Whoa, I almost got mowed down by a ton of teens!" B: "They must have been flocking after the hunky actor that just left the restaurant."
See also: after, flock

flock around (someone or something)

To gather around someone or something in large numbers. A: "Why is there such a big crowd outside?" B: "Oh, people must be flocking around the hunky actor that just left the restaurant."
See also: around, flock

flock in(to) (some place or thing)

To move into some place or thing in large numbers. As soon as the bell rang, kids began flocking into the school building.
See also: flock, place

flock to (someone or something)

To visit or come to someone or something in large numbers. Kids always flock to Aunt Judy—she must have the magic touch. People have been flocking to our restaurant ever since we got that glowing review in the Sunday paper.
See also: flock

flock together

To come together or form a group. Often used of animals. We watched as the geese flocked together overhead.
See also: flock, together

Birds of a feather flock together.

Prov. Similar people tend to associate with each other. I always thought Amy was pretentious, and now she's going out with that snobbish boy, Louis. Birds of a feather flock together. George: Why do you think Donald is dishonest? Ned: All his friends are dishonest. Birds of a feather flock together.
See also: Bird, feather, flock, of, together

flock after someone or something

to follow someone or something in a group. The children flocked after the man playing the flute. Fans flocked after the movie star as he went from his limo into the hotel.
See also: after, flock

flock around someone or something

to crowd around someone or something. All the children will flock around the magician to see how the tricks are performed. The guests flocked around the birthday cake.
See also: around, flock

flock in(to) (some place)

Fig. [for people] to move into some place in crowds. People were flocking into the store where everything was on sale.
See also: flock

flock to someone or something

Fig. [for people] to come to someone or something in great numbers. Many people flocked to the shopping mall for the post holiday discounts. The kids flocked to the movie theater on Saturday afternoon.
See also: flock

flock together

to gather together in great numbers. (*Typically said of birds and sheep.) A large number of blackbirds flocked together, making a lot of noise. Do sheep really flock together in a storm?
See also: flock, together

birds of a feather (flock together)

Individuals of like character, taste, or background (tend to stay together), as in The members of the club had no trouble selecting their yearly outing-they're all birds of a feather . The idea of like seeks like dates from ancient Greek times, and "Birds dwell with their kind" was quoted in the apocryphal book of Ecclesiasticus. The full saying in English, Birds of a feather flock together, was first recorded in 1545.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

If you describe two or more people as birds of a feather, you mean that they are very similar in many ways. Nancy and my mother were birds of a feather. You felt something special between them that left you out. We're birds of a feather, you and me, Mr Plimpton. Note: You can also use the full expression birds of a feather flock together to mean that similar people like to be with each other. Birds of a feather flock together. Basically, people seek out neighbourhoods that are most congenial to them.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

people with similar tastes, interests, etc.
This phrase comes from the proverb birds of a feather flock together , which has been current in this form since the late 16th century. Its origins may ultimately lie in the Apocrypha: ‘the birds will resort unto their like’ (Ecclesiasticus 27:9).
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a ˈfeather (flock toˈgether)

(saying) similar people (spend time together): She spent most of her time abroad with other English speakers, which I suppose is only natural. Birds of a feather flock together, after all.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

and BOF
phr. & comp. abb. people who share an interest or proclivity. Those guys are really birds of a feather. They are always together. We’re BOF and love to hike and enjoy nature.
See also: bird, feather, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Many Chinese Christians left their denominations to join the Little Flock, to the extent that the Protestant missionaries in Fuzhou often accused the Little Flock of "stealing sheep.
After adding high-quality sheep to his flock, the farmer increased his focus on research and now sends 50 lambs per year to the Scottish College's CT unit analysis.
However, after 1st brooding day, p values between the two flocks were found in the range of 0.
4) Mimic a natural flock environment in which the mother hen hatches and raises her young, the gander goose protects and cares for the flock, and the birds are harvested at a natural age.
This method is a great way to generate heat from the composting process in the coop for your flock all winter long.
Following the acquisition, Flock will rebrand to "Flock - linked by Isobar," adding a new cornerstone to Isobar's growing global footprint.
Currently, Flock covers the MTA subway and the 4 boroughs of New York City: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and Bronx.
The USDA's Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service confirmed on March 10 that the H5N2 avian influenza was found in a turkey flock there.
Once you've scattered a brood flock, wait and quietly listen for them to start yelping and kee-keeing.
It confirms you've done things perfectly, and watching flock after flock will leave you wanting just one more day before it all comes to an end.
Difficult to diagnose and contagious, they say MV has spread, especially in commercial flocks.
There is a need to educate farmer to vaccinate their poultry flock regularly and properly against these disease to minimize the losses.
Yijkl = The lth observation of the k category of female of the jth category of male of the ith flock u = Population mean Fi = Effect of the ith flock (i = 4), treated as blocks Sj = Effect of the jth category of male (k = 3) Wk = Effect of the kth category of female (j = 3) eijk = Random error associated with the ith flock and jth body weight category.
The Backyard Flock program encourages backyard poultry owners to submit dead birds for postmortem examination.
A MAJOR reduction sale is being held of Charollais females from the breed's Welsh regional flock winners.