fling

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fling (one's) bonnet over the windmill

To act in a deranged, reckless, or unconventional manner. Refers to the eponymous character of the novel Don Quixote, who tosses his hat over a windmill (which he imagines is a giant) as a challenge to it. Sarah is always trying to buck social conventions, flinging her bonnet over the windmill whenever possible. I know you like to take risks in business, but don't fling your bonnet over the windmill.
See also: bonnet, fling, windmill

fling (one's) cap over the windmill

To act in a deranged, reckless, or unconventional manner. Refers to the eponymous character of the novel Don Quixote, who tosses his hat over a windmill (which he imagines is a giant) as a challenge to it. Sarah is always trying to buck social conventions, flinging her cap over the windmill whenever possible. I know you like to take risks in business, but don't fling your cap over the windmill.
See also: cap, fling, windmill

fling (one's) hat over the windmill

To act in a deranged, reckless, or unconventional manner. Refers to the eponymous character of the novel Don Quixote, who tosses his hat over a windmill (which he imagines is a giant) as a challenge to it. Sarah is always trying to buck social conventions, flinging her hat over the windmill whenever possible. I know you like to take risks in business, but don't fling your hat over the windmill.
See also: fling, hat, windmill

have a fling (with someone)

To have a brief, noncommittal sexual relationship (with someone). I had a few flings in college, but it was only after I graduated that I started having any serious relationships. The professor lost her job for having a fling with one of her students.
See also: fling, have

final fling

Fig. the last act or period of enjoyment before a change in one's circumstances or lifestyle. You might as well have a final fling before the baby's born. Mary's going out with her girlfriends for a final fling. She's getting married next week.
See also: final, fling

fling one's head back

to tilt one's head back quickly. She flung her head back and laughed heartily. She flung back her head and laughed.
See also: back, fling, head

fling someone or something around

to sling or throw someone or something around. Don't fling your wet clothing around. You are messing up the whole room. Don't fling around all your clothes.
See also: around, fling

fling someone or something aside

to toss or sling someone or something aside or out of the way. She flung aside the covers and leaped out of bed. She flung the covers aside.
See also: aside, fling

fling someone or something away

to throw or sling someone or something away or out of the way. You can't just fling me away! I am your eldest son! You can't just fling away the things you don't want!
See also: away, fling

fling someone or something back

 
1. to sling or throw someone or something backwards. I had to fling the child back, away from the fire. I flung back the door and ran out. Walt grabbed at the door and flung it back.
2. to return someone or something by slinging or throwing. She took the little fish and flung it back into the water. Did you fling back the ball to Roger?
See also: back, fling

fling someone or something down

to throw or push someone or something down. He flung the book down in great anger. He flung down the book and ran from the room.
See also: down, fling

fling someone or something out of something

 and fling someone or something out
to sling or throw someone or some thing out of something or some place. In anger, she flung the cat out of the window. She flung out the cat and closed the window.
See also: fling, of, out

fling something at someone or something

to throw something roughly or carelessly at someone or something. Don't fling that towel at me! Don't just fling that paper at the wastebasket, hoping it will get there!
See also: fling

fling something in(to) something

 and fling something in
to throw something into something. I will fling this thing in the trash. It is junk! Liz opened the laundry chute and flung in her clothes. She flung them in.
See also: fling

fling something off of oneself

 and fling something off 
1. to pull or throw something off of oneself hastily. She flung the blanket off herself. She flung off the blanket.
2. to pull or take off an article of clothing. Larry flung his jacket off and went straight to the kitchen. He flung off his jacket.
See also: fling, of, off

fling something off (of) something

 and fling something off
to yank or pull something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) He flung the bedspread off the bed and dived in. He flung off the covers and dived into bed.
See also: fling, off

fling something on oneself

 and fling something on
to put an article of clothing onto oneself hastily. She got up and flung on her robe. She flung her robe on and went to answer the door.
See also: fling, on

fling something up in someone's face

Fig. to bring a problem up and confront someone with it. Don't fling it up in my face! It's not my fault! I don't like anyone to fling up my past in my face.
See also: face, fling, up

fling something up (in something)

to throw one's arms or hands up in an expression of some emotion, such as despair, horror, disgust, resignation. She flung her hands up in despair. She flung up her hands and cried out for help.
See also: fling, up

fling up

Sl. to empty one's stomach; to vomit. I was afraid I was going to fling up. Who flung up on the sidewalk?
See also: fling, up

throw oneself at someone

 and fling oneself at someone
Fig. to give oneself willingly to someone else for romance. I guess that Mary really likes John. She practically threw herself at him when he came into the room. Everyone could see by the way Tom flung himself at Jane that he was going to ask her for a date.
See also: throw

fling oneself at someone

Also, fling or throw oneself at someone's head . Try openly to make someone love one. For example, She was constantly phoning him and inviting him over, really flinging herself at him, or Mom said she should stop throwing herself at his head.
See also: fling

last fling

A final enjoyment of freedom. For example, He's planning to have one last fling before joining the army. This expression employs fling in the sense of "a brief period of indulging one's impulses," a usage dating from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: fling, last

throw oneself at

Also, throw oneself at someone's head. Try to attract someone's interest, attention, or love, as in He always had women throwing themselves at his head. [Late 1700s]
See also: throw

fling up

in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. I was afraid I was going to fling up.
See also: fling, up

fling-wing

n. a helicopter. The fling-wing from the radio station is hovering over the traffic jam.

throw oneself at

To make efforts to attract the interest or affection of (another).
See also: throw
References in classic literature ?
He then immediately went upstairs, and flinging open the door of the chamber with much violence, awaked poor Jones from a very sound nap, into which he was fallen, and, what was still worse, from a delicious dream concerning Sophia.
Then the boat emerged, half swamped, Leach flinging the water out and Johnson clinging to the steering-oar, his face white and anxious.
Her husband was on the premises and before I knew it there was this almighty row and he was going on about who did I think I was flinging sweaty clothes at his wife and I said, you don't understand, it is the sporty thing to do, Andre does it, Pete does it.
In an alternate scenario, Jupiter and Saturn moved to their orbits over 5 million years by simply flinging away space rocks, but this would have visibly scarred the asteroid belt.
It is suspected that Rajesh may have taken the ornaments, flinging only the bag and its remaining contents into the drain.
You wouldn't catch me flinging myself around in the mud on a Sunday afternoon.
During courtship, female spotted bowerbirds like a guy to get wild--charging into walls and flinging around bleached bones--but they also prefer to watch the show from behind a see-through barrier.
Nicole, mum of their two-year-old son Nicholas, wooed him by flinging herself across his car bonnet.
After a half hour of preshow dancing by the audience the five members of Sarah Skaggs Dance burst out, flinging themselves into and through the space with an energy that seemed too large to contain.