flight

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flight of fancy

An imaginative but unrealistic idea. No one took his campaign for office seriously because his proposed solutions to problems were filled with flights of fancy.
See also: fancy, flight, of

flight of fantasy

An imaginative but unrealistic idea. No one took his campaign for office seriously because his proposed solutions to problems were filled with flights of fantasy.
See also: fantasy, flight, of

flight of imagination

An imaginative but unrealistic idea. No one took his campaign for office seriously because his proposed solutions to problems were filled with flights of imagination.
See also: flight, imagination, of

flight of fancy

an idea or suggestion that is out of touch with reality or possibility. What is the point in indulging in flights of fancy about exotic vacations when you cannot even afford the rent?
See also: fancy, flight, of

Have a nice flight.

Please enjoy your flight. (Said when wishing someone well on an airplane trip. Often said by airline personnel to their passengers.) Clerk: Here's your ticket, sir. Have a nice flight. Fred: Thanks. As Mary boarded the plane, the flight attendant said, "Have a nice flight."
See also: flight, have, nice

in flight

while flying. A passenger became ill in flight and the pilot had to return to the airport. I really don't care to eat in flight. I am too nervous.
See also: flight

in full flight

fleeing at great speed; escaping rapidly. The robbers were in full flight before the bank manager even called the sheriff.
See also: flight, full

a flight of fancy/fantasy/imagination

an idea which shows a lot of imagination but which is not practical or useful in real situations You were talking about cycling across the US, or was that just another flight of fancy?
See also: fancy, flight, of

the top flight

the highest level in a job or a sport The Sheffield Eagles move down to the second division after two seasons in the top flight.
See also: flight, top

flight of fancy

An unrealistic idea or fantastic notion, a pipe dream. For example, She engaged in flights of fancy, such as owning a million-dollar house. This idiom uses flight in the sense of "a soaring of the imagination," a usage dating from the mid-1600s.
See also: fancy, flight, of

put to flight

Cause to run away, as in The bombs put the civilians to flight. [Mid-1800s]
See also: flight, put

take flight

Also, take wing. Run away, flee, go away, as in When the militia arrived, the demonstrators took flight, or The tenant took wing before paying the rent. The first idiom derives from the earlier take one's flight, dating from the late 1300s, and was first recorded in 1435. The variant was first recorded in 1704.
See also: flight, take

top-flight

mod. of the highest caliber. We are looking for a top-flight manager for our new division.
References in classic literature ?
Until his flight indeed, he did not and could not contrive to exist in the public mind.
I pray you to draw a flight shaft with all your strength down the valley, that we may see the length of your shoot.
At an altitude of five hundred feet, the pigeon drove on over the town of Berkeley and lifted its flight to the Contra Costa hills.
Hast thou turnd the least of these To flight, or if to fall, but that they rise Unvanquisht, easier to transact with mee That thou shouldst hope, imperious, & with threats To chase me hence?
But we were obliged to fire at them during flight, which gave us few chances to bring them down; and, indeed, we vainly exhausted one half our ammunition.
The front of this living column was distinctly marked by a line but very slightly indented, so regular and even was the flight.
Turning my thoat, I urged him after her, hoping to reach her side and bear her on again in our hopeless flight.
Joe, who had immediately sprung up after his fall, just as one of the swiftest horsemen rushed upon him, bounded like a panther, avoided his assailant by leaping to one side, jumped up behind him on the crupper, seized the Arab by the throat, and, strangling him with his sinewy hands and fingers of steel, flung him on the sand, and continued his headlong flight.
Such was the thought of Aramis, when, after having fought the fight, he decided upon flight - a flight most dangerous, since all the assailants were not dead; and that, admitting the possibility of putting the bark to sea, they would have to fly in open day, before the conquered, so interested on recognizing their small number, in pursuing their conquerors.
After the twenty-eighth of October when the frosts began, the flight of the French assumed a still more tragic character, with men freezing, or roasting themselves to death at the campfires, while carriages with people dressed in furs continued to drive past, carrying away the property that had been stolen by the Emperor, kings, and dukes; but the process of the flight and disintegration of the French army went on essentially as before.
Strutting about with great show and braggadocio, he strove to impress his followers with the mere nothingness of so trivial a feat as flying birdlike thousands of yards above the jungle, though it was long until he had thoroughly convinced himself by the force of autosuggestion that he had enjoyed every instant of the flight and was already far advanced in the art of aviation.
So they again took up their flight through the wilderness, taking with them a half-dozen of the Mosulas to carry provisions and the tents that Anderssen had smuggled aboard the small boat in preparation for the attempted escape.
A second arrow and a third soared up, missing Broken-Tooth, rustling the leaves as they passed through, arching in their flight and returning to earth.
He read only fear and panic from the sounds, deduced that the village was fleeing to its mountain fastnesses, but did not know the cause of the flight.
Going around the right angle in which it ended, he encountered a narrow flight of steps.