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Related to flighted: take wing

flight of fancy

an idea or suggestion that is out of touch with reality or possibility. What is the point in indulging in flights of fancy about exotic vacations when you cannot even afford the rent?
See also: fancy, flight, of

Have a nice flight.

Please enjoy your flight. (Said when wishing someone well on an airplane trip. Often said by airline personnel to their passengers.) Clerk: Here's your ticket, sir. Have a nice flight. Fred: Thanks. As Mary boarded the plane, the flight attendant said, "Have a nice flight."
See also: flight, have, nice

in flight

while flying. A passenger became ill in flight and the pilot had to return to the airport. I really don't care to eat in flight. I am too nervous.
See also: flight

in full flight

fleeing at great speed; escaping rapidly. The robbers were in full flight before the bank manager even called the sheriff.
See also: flight, full

a flight of fancy/fantasy/imagination

an idea which shows a lot of imagination but which is not practical or useful in real situations You were talking about cycling across the US, or was that just another flight of fancy?
See also: fancy, flight, of

the top flight

the highest level in a job or a sport The Sheffield Eagles move down to the second division after two seasons in the top flight.
See also: flight, top

flight of fancy

An unrealistic idea or fantastic notion, a pipe dream. For example, She engaged in flights of fancy, such as owning a million-dollar house. This idiom uses flight in the sense of "a soaring of the imagination," a usage dating from the mid-1600s.
See also: fancy, flight, of

put to flight

Cause to run away, as in The bombs put the civilians to flight. [Mid-1800s]
See also: flight, put

take flight

Also, take wing. Run away, flee, go away, as in When the militia arrived, the demonstrators took flight, or The tenant took wing before paying the rent. The first idiom derives from the earlier take one's flight, dating from the late 1300s, and was first recorded in 1435. The variant was first recorded in 1704.
See also: flight, take


mod. of the highest caliber. We are looking for a top-flight manager for our new division.