flew


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fly beneath (the/someone's) radar

To go without being noticed, detected, or addressed. A: "Have you heard this band's latest album?" B: "I didn't even know it was out, it must have flown beneath my radar." Every year, the government promises to do something about the homelessness problem, yet every year it seems to fly beneath the radar.
See also: beneath, fly, radar

fly under (the/someone's) radar

To go without being noticed, detected, or addressed. A: "Have you heard this band's latest album?" B: "I didn't even know it was out, it must have flown under my radar." Every year, the government promises to do something about the homelessness problem, yet every year it seems to fly under the radar again.
See also: fly, radar

fly by the seat of (one's) pants

To rely on one's instinct, as opposed to acting according to a set plan. I really don't know how to operate this thing, I'm just flying by the seat of my pants here. You can't just fly by the seat of your pants, Jenna—please give your future some serious thought.
See also: fly, of, pant, seat

fly in the face of

To be or act in clear opposition to something else. I can't believe you said something so awful. It flies in the face of everything we stand for! Don't quit now, that just flies in the face of all your hard work.
See also: face, fly, of

fly in the teeth of

To be or act in clear opposition to something else. I can't believe you said something so awful. It flies in the teeth of everything we stand for! Don't quit now, that just flies in the teeth of all your hard work.
See also: fly, of, teeth

fly in the face of someone or something

 and fly in the teeth of someone or something
Fig. to challenge someone or something; to go against someone or something. This idea flies in the face of everything we know about matter and energy. You had better not fly in the face of the committee.
See also: face, fly, of

fly in the face of something

to be the opposite of what is usual or accepted His decision to start his own business certainly flies in the face of good judgment.
See also: face, fly, of

fly in the face of something

  (slightly formal)
to be the opposite of what is usual or accepted These recommendations fly in the face of previous advice on safe limits for alcohol consumption.
See also: face, fly, of

fly in the face of

Also, fly in the teeth of. Act in direct opposition to or defiance of. For example, This decision flies in the face of all precedent, or They went out without permission, flying in the teeth of house rules. This metaphoric expression alludes to a physical attack. [Mid-1500s]
See also: face, fly, of
References in classic literature ?
Then all the Winged Monkeys, with much laughing and chattering and noise, flew into the air and were soon out of sight.
Once the Witch struck Toto a blow with her umbrella and the brave little dog flew at her and bit her leg in return.
When the moon rose he flew back to the Happy Prince.
So the Swallow plucked out the Prince's eye, and flew away to the student's garret.
So the Swallow flew over the great city, and saw the rich making merry in their beautiful houses, while the beggars were sitting at the gates.
Then he flew back and told the Prince what he had seen.
Cox, Steve Dillman, and a half-dozen other pilots who flew in Vietnam have been fighting the blaze that authorities hope to have under control on Monday.
And on the first night we flew those escorted by F-15Cs out of Germany--the biggest humanitarian airdrop in the history of combat aviation.
VMF-323 and VMF-214 Corsairs flew cover for the Marines, pouring machine gun fire into enemy positions not 50 yards ahead of the assault forces.
General Charles "Chuck" Sweeney, who flew the missions to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, said the museum is "a marvelous idea for Dutchess County and for the children of the Hudson Valley and for aviation as a whole.
Nadreau, who flew the C-17 last week and has more simulator hours on the aircraft than any other pilot, calls the C-17 a pilot's dream.
Crane and other F-16 pilots flew overhead in the ``missing man formation,'' in which one jet pulls up to leave a vacant position as the formation flies over the ceremony.
flew combat missions in Italy and returned home to train bomber crews at Tuskegee.
and flew regularly into his 80s, was a member of a group of civilian pilots assembled by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the forerunner of NASA, in the early 1950s.