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fly (one's) freak flag

slang To behave in or embrace an unusual, unconventional, or uninhibited manner or mode of being. My parents are rather conservative, so it's liberating to be in college where I can fly the freak flag without worrying about their reprisals. My favorite music tends to come from artists who aren't afraid to fly their freak flags a bit.
See also: flag, fly, freak

freak flag

Any unconventional, nonconformist, or uninhibited behavior, convictions, opinions, or lifestyle choices that are unique to an individual. My high school literature teacher taught me to always be true to myself and to wear my freak flag proudly.
See also: flag, freak

raise a red flag

To offer a sign or signal indicating potential, incipient, or imminent danger or trouble. Didn't the fact that your accountant used to be a drug dealer raise a red flag or two when you started doing business with him? Well, it definitely raised a red flag when he got so angry at me over such a minor thing, but I never thought he could be so unreasonable to live with!
See also: flag, raise, red

red flag

A sign or signal indicating potential, incipient, or imminent danger or trouble. There are a couple of red flags you need to look out for to make sure your company stays in the black. Well, it definitely raised a red flag when he got so angry at me over such a minor thing, but I never thought he could be so unreasonable to live with!
See also: flag, red

be like a red flag to a bull

To be a willfully infuriating or aggravating provocation; to be something that incites great anger or annoyance. An allusion to matadors' practice of waving red flags at a bull during a bullfight, though the color of the flag actually makes no difference to the animal. John's gone to gloat about his success over his brother, which is like a red flag to a bull, if you ask me. You do realize that bringing your new girlfriend to your ex-wife's house is like a red flag to a bull, right?
See also: bull, flag, like, red

a red flag to a bull

A willfully infuriating or aggravating provocation; something that incites great anger or annoyance. An allusion to matadors' practice of waving red flags at a bull during a bullfight, though the color of the flag actually makes no difference to the animal. John's gone to gloat about his success over his brother, which is a red flag to a bull if I've ever seen one. You do realize that bringing your new girlfriend to your ex-wife's house is like a red flag to a bull, right?
See also: bull, flag, red

show the flag

To stand up for, support, or defend someone or something. A number of people from the actor's hometown are arriving into New York to show the flag at his debut performance on Broadway. My country is often a target for insults or gibes abroad, so whenever I go traveling I make a point of showing the flag for it.
See also: flag, show

hoist (a/the) white flag

To offer a sign of surrender or defeat; to yield or give in. After the prosecutors brought forward their newest evidence, the defendant hoisted the white flag and agreed to the plea bargain. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to hoist a white flag.
See also: flag, hoist, white

show (a/the) white flag

To offer a sign of surrender or defeat; to yield or give in. After the prosecutors brought forward their newest evidence, the defendant showed the white flag and agreed to the plea bargain. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to show a white flag.
See also: flag, show, white

wave (a/the) white flag

To offer a sign of surrender or defeat; to yield or give in. After the prosecutors brought forward their newest evidence, the defendant waved the white flag and agreed to the plea bargain. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to wave a white flag.
See also: flag, wave, white

white flag

A signal of surrender or defeat; a sign that one going to yield or give up. (From the literal white flag originating in military use, which signaled a protective truce or ceasefire so that negotiations could be arranged.) The president's speech today was seen by many as a white flag regarding his controversial stance on the immigration debate. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to wave a white flag.
See also: flag, white

raise the white flag

To indicate one's surrender, defeat, or submission. All right, I raise the white flag—you win the game. That attack totally decimated us, and we were forced to raise the white flag.
See also: flag, raise, white

red-flag term

A word that is particularly offensive or controversial and thus sparks an immediate emotional reaction. The phrase may reference the red flag because it is the tool traditionally used by matadors to aggravate bulls. How dare you say a red-flag term like that to me, your own mother! Please don't say any red-flag terms at this dinner party.
See also: term

Spanish flag

A nickname for the California rockfish, due to its red and white markings. I caught a Spanish flag while I was out on the boat today.
See also: flag, Spanish

strike (one's) flag

To lower the flag on a ship in a show of surrender. Captain, they've struck their flag! We've won!
See also: flag, strike

show a/the white flag

To show a sign of surrender or defeat; to yield or give in. After the prosecuters brought forward their newest evidence, the defendant showed the white flag and agreed to the plea bargain. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to show a white flag.
See also: flag, show, white

flag someone or something down

to signal or wave, indicating that someone should stop. Please go out and flag a taxi down. I'll be right out. She went to flag down a taxi.
See also: down, flag

flag down somebody/something

also flag somebody/something down
to signal someone or something to stop by waving A police officer flagged us down to check our vehicle registration and date of inspection.
See also: down, flag

wave the flag

also show the flag
to defend and support someone or something Marsalis waves the flag better than anyone and attracts new fans to jazz all the time. Brown's job is to show the flag for the president and remind voters that he is working for them.
Usage notes: also used in the form fly the flag: When she was in jail, several newspapers flew the flag for her.
See also: flag, wave

wrap yourself in the flag

to say that that your beliefs or actions are only to benefit your country Politicians are usually happy to wrap themselves in the flag and avoid the issues.
See also: flag, wrap

drape/wrap yourself in the flag

to pretend to do something for your country when you are really doing it for your own advantage Companies in the UK are finding it useful to wrap themselves in the British flag.
See also: drape, flag

fly/show/wave the flag

to support or to represent your country (often + for ) In the absence of any other Italian film directors, Mr Infascelli bravely flew the flag for his country.
See also: flag, fly

Put the flags out!

  (British humorous)
something that you say when you are pleased and surprised that something has happened John's done the washing up. Put the flags out!
See also: flag, put

flag down

Signal to stop, as in The police were flagging down all cars. This expression uses the verb flag in the sense of "catch the attention of, as by waving a flag," a usage dating from the mid-1800s; down was added in the first half of the 1900s.
See also: down, flag

white flag, show the

Also, hang out or hoist the white flag . Surrender, yield, as in Our opponents held all the cards tonight, so we showed the white flag and left early. This expression alludes to the white flag indicating a surrender in battle, a custom apparently dating from Roman times and adopted as an international symbol of surrender or truce. [Late 1600s]
See also: show, white

flag down

v.
To signal something or someone to stop: I flagged down a taxi when it started raining. When we ran out of gas, we flagged the police officer down to ask for help.
See also: down, flag

flag

1. tv. to fail a course. Pat flagged English again.
2. n. the grade of F. I’ll get a flag on algebra for the semester.
3. tv. to arrest someone. (see also flagged.) They flagged Bob for speeding even though he was a judge.
4. n. a headcloth or bandana, especially one that shows gang identity. (Streets.) The kid wore a “flag” that alerted the officers to the fact that he was a gang member.

flagged

mod. arrested. Sally was flagged, and she called her fixer to come get her out.
See also: flag