fist

(redirected from fists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

an iron fist in a velvet glove

A person who has a gentle, sweet, or unassuming appearance or disposition, but who in reality is particularly severe, forceful, and uncompromising. Tom is in for it now with his wife. She might seem like a nice lady to us, but she's an iron fist in a velvet glove. The new leader of the country rose to power by promises of democracy and equality to its citizens, but as his despotic intentions came to light he soon proved to be an iron fist in a velvet glove.
See also: fist, glove, iron, velvet

fist bump

1. noun The act of touching the knuckle side of one's clenched fist with someone else's, either as a greeting or in a cheerful or celebratory manner. Also known as a "pound." He was so excited by the team's overtime win that he gave everyone fist bumps as we left the stadium.
2. verb To touch one's clenched fist with someone else's in such a manner. He was so excited by the team's overtime win that he was fist bumping everyone as we left the stadium.
See also: bump, fist

hand over fist

Fig. [for money and merchandise to be exchanged] very rapidly. What a busy day. We took in money hand over fist. They were buying things hand over fist.
See also: fist, hand

rule with an iron fist

Fig. to rule in a very stern manner. The dictator ruled with an iron fist and terrified the citizens. My boss rules with an iron fist. I'm looking for a new job.
See also: fist, iron, rule

*tight as a drum

 
1. stretched tight. (*Also: as ~.) Julia stretched the upholstery fabric over the seat of the chair until it was as tight as a drum. The skin on his scalp is tight as a drum.
2. sealed tight. (*Also: as ~.) Now that I've caulked all the windows, the house should be tight as a drum. Your butterfly died because the jar is as tight as a drum.
3. and *tight as Midas's fist very stingy. (*Also: as ~.) He won't contribute a cent. He's as tight as a drum. Old Mr. Robinson is tight as Midas's fist. Won't spend money on anything.
See also: drum, tight

two-fisted

Fig. [of a male] aggressive and feisty. Perry is a real, two-fisted cowboy, always ready for a fight or a drunken brawl.

hand over fist

quickly and continuously A few years ago, those people made money hand over fist. Developers are putting up cheap new houses hand over fist in our town.
See also: fist, hand

make a good fist of something/doing something

  (British & Australian old-fashioned)
to do something well He made a good fist of explaining why we need to improve our public transport system. He built the house himself and made a surprisingly good fist of it. (British & Australian old-fashioned)
See also: fist, good, make, of

ham-fisted

  (British) also ham-handed (American)
1. lacking skill with the hands I hoped you weren't watching my ham-fisted attempts to get the cake out of the tin.
2. lacking skill in the way that you deal with people The report criticizes the ham-fisted way in which complaints are dealt with.

hand over fist

if you make or lose money hand over fist, you make or lose large amounts of it very quickly Business was good and we were making money hand over fist.
See also: fist, hand

an iron fist/hand in a velvet glove

something that you say when you are describing someone who seems to be gentle but is in fact severe and firm To enforce each new law the president uses persuasion first, and then force - the iron hand in the velvet glove.
See also: fist, glove, iron, velvet

rule (somebody) with a rod of iron

  (British, American & Australian) also rule (somebody) with an iron fist/hand (American & Australian)
to control a group of people very firmly, having complete power over everything that they do For 17 years she ruled the country with a rod of iron. My uncle rules the family business with an iron hand.
See also: iron, of, rod, rule

hand over fist

Rapidly, at a tremendous rate, as in He's making money hand over fist. This expression is derived from the nautical hand over hand, describing how a sailor climbed a rope. [First half of 1800s]
See also: fist, hand

tight as a drum

Taut or close-fitting; also, watertight. For example, That baby's eaten so much that the skin on his belly is tight as a drum, or You needn't worry about leaks; this tent is tight as a drum. Originally this expression alluded to the skin of a drumhead, which is tightly stretched, and in the mid-1800s was transferred to other kinds of tautness. Later, however, it sometimes referred to a drum-shaped container, such as an oil drum, which had to be well sealed to prevent leaks, and the expression then signified "watertight."
See also: drum, tight

hand over fist

mod. repeatedly and energetically, especially as with taking in money in a great volume. We were taking in fees hand over fist, and the people were lined up for blocks.
See also: fist, hand

two-fisted drinker

n. a heavy drinker; someone who drinks with both hands. The world is filled with guys who aspire to be two-fisted drinkers.

hand over fist

At a tremendous rate: made money hand over fist.
See also: fist, hand

hand over fist

Continuously. A sailor hauls in lines (“ropes” to you, landlubbers) not by jerky interrupted pulls, but in a smooth hand-over-hand motion. That's the image applied to people who make money hand over fist, which is how the phrase is most always used.
See also: fist, hand
References in classic literature ?
One was so blinded by the light that he came straight for me, and I felt his bones grind under the blow of my fist.
With hatred in his eyes, foaming at his mouth, and his fist extended, Mordaunt had advanced one more step, a threatening, terrible step, toward De Winter.
After that, when in discussions with his village elders or stewards the blood rushed to his face and his fists began to clench, Nicholas would turn the broken ring on his finger and would drop his eyes before the man who was making him angry.
Tom lifted his fist with a menacing gesture; she uttered a loud, shrill scream, ran to the other side of me, and made a face at him.
It was a man's fist, directed by a man so angry and in such haste that the fist had missed the jaw for which it was aimed.
The woman screamed and shook her fists before her husband's eyes.
Just before it was effected, and at the precise moment that Ponta was ready with his own body to receive the snuggling in of Joe's body, Joe drew back slightly and drove with his fists at his opponent's unprotected stomach.
Judge Witberg backed away in alarm before the menacing fists of the other.
The victory, according to modern custom, was like to be decided by numbers, when, on a sudden, a fourth pair of fists appeared in the battle, and immediately paid their compliments to the parson; and the owner of them at the same time crying out, "Are not you ashamed, and be d--n'd to you, to fall two of you upon one?
His big fists were clenching and unclenching, and his face was positively fiendish, so malignantly did he look at Johnson.
But they lack fists: their fingers do not know how to creep behind fists.
Vainly the judges and watchers begged, pleaded, yelled, and swung with their fists.
why, I buys a gal, and if she's got a young un to be sold, I jest walks up and puts my fist to her face, and says,
He mounted another step threateningly as if it were his energetic intention to jump down and deal with her; but as she came toward him he evidently thought better of it and stood on the top step of his ladder shaking his fist down at her.
They express the consciousness that you have no enemy to punish, but that you have pain; the consciousness that in spite of all possible Wagenheims you are in complete slavery to your teeth; that if someone wishes it, your teeth will leave off aching, and if he does not, they will go on aching another three months; and that finally if you are still contumacious and still protest, all that is left you for your own gratification is to thrash yourself or beat your wall with your fist as hard as you can, and absolutely nothing more.