fist


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Related to fist: fiat

an iron fist in a velvet glove

A person who has a gentle, sweet, or unassuming appearance or disposition, but who in reality is particularly severe, forceful, and uncompromising. Tom is in for it now with his wife. She might seem like a nice lady to us, but she's an iron fist in a velvet glove. The new leader of the country rose to power by promises of democracy and equality to its citizens, but as his despotic intentions came to light he soon proved to be an iron fist in a velvet glove.
See also: fist, glove, iron, velvet

fist bump

1. noun The act of touching the knuckle side of one's clenched fist with someone else's, either as a greeting or in a cheerful or celebratory manner. Also known as a "pound." He was so excited by the team's overtime win that he gave everyone fist bumps as we left the stadium.
2. verb To touch one's clenched fist with someone else's in such a manner. He was so excited by the team's overtime win that he was fist bumping everyone as we left the stadium.
See also: bump, fist

hand over fist

Fig. [for money and merchandise to be exchanged] very rapidly. What a busy day. We took in money hand over fist. They were buying things hand over fist.
See also: fist, hand

rule with an iron fist

Fig. to rule in a very stern manner. The dictator ruled with an iron fist and terrified the citizens. My boss rules with an iron fist. I'm looking for a new job.
See also: fist, iron, rule

*tight as a drum

 
1. stretched tight. (*Also: as ~.) Julia stretched the upholstery fabric over the seat of the chair until it was as tight as a drum. The skin on his scalp is tight as a drum.
2. sealed tight. (*Also: as ~.) Now that I've caulked all the windows, the house should be tight as a drum. Your butterfly died because the jar is as tight as a drum.
3. and *tight as Midas's fist very stingy. (*Also: as ~.) He won't contribute a cent. He's as tight as a drum. Old Mr. Robinson is tight as Midas's fist. Won't spend money on anything.
See also: drum, tight

two-fisted

Fig. [of a male] aggressive and feisty. Perry is a real, two-fisted cowboy, always ready for a fight or a drunken brawl.

hand over fist

quickly and continuously A few years ago, those people made money hand over fist. Developers are putting up cheap new houses hand over fist in our town.
See also: fist, hand

make a good fist of something/doing something

  (British & Australian old-fashioned)
to do something well He made a good fist of explaining why we need to improve our public transport system. He built the house himself and made a surprisingly good fist of it. (British & Australian old-fashioned)
See also: fist, good, make, of

ham-fisted

  (British) also ham-handed (American)
1. lacking skill with the hands I hoped you weren't watching my ham-fisted attempts to get the cake out of the tin.
2. lacking skill in the way that you deal with people The report criticizes the ham-fisted way in which complaints are dealt with.

hand over fist

if you make or lose money hand over fist, you make or lose large amounts of it very quickly Business was good and we were making money hand over fist.
See also: fist, hand

an iron fist/hand in a velvet glove

something that you say when you are describing someone who seems to be gentle but is in fact severe and firm To enforce each new law the president uses persuasion first, and then force - the iron hand in the velvet glove.
See also: fist, glove, iron, velvet

rule (somebody) with a rod of iron

  (British, American & Australian) also rule (somebody) with an iron fist/hand (American & Australian)
to control a group of people very firmly, having complete power over everything that they do For 17 years she ruled the country with a rod of iron. My uncle rules the family business with an iron hand.
See also: iron, of, rod, rule

hand over fist

Rapidly, at a tremendous rate, as in He's making money hand over fist. This expression is derived from the nautical hand over hand, describing how a sailor climbed a rope. [First half of 1800s]
See also: fist, hand

tight as a drum

Taut or close-fitting; also, watertight. For example, That baby's eaten so much that the skin on his belly is tight as a drum, or You needn't worry about leaks; this tent is tight as a drum. Originally this expression alluded to the skin of a drumhead, which is tightly stretched, and in the mid-1800s was transferred to other kinds of tautness. Later, however, it sometimes referred to a drum-shaped container, such as an oil drum, which had to be well sealed to prevent leaks, and the expression then signified "watertight."
See also: drum, tight

hand over fist

mod. repeatedly and energetically, especially as with taking in money in a great volume. We were taking in fees hand over fist, and the people were lined up for blocks.
See also: fist, hand

two-fisted drinker

n. a heavy drinker; someone who drinks with both hands. The world is filled with guys who aspire to be two-fisted drinkers.

hand over fist

At a tremendous rate: made money hand over fist.
See also: fist, hand

hand over fist

Continuously. A sailor hauls in lines (“ropes” to you, landlubbers) not by jerky interrupted pulls, but in a smooth hand-over-hand motion. That's the image applied to people who make money hand over fist, which is how the phrase is most always used.
See also: fist, hand
References in classic literature ?
Now," said Loker, with a tremendous oath, and striking the table with his heavy fist, "don't I know you, Dan Haley?
He stopped shaking his fist very suddenly at that very moment and his jaw actually dropped as he stared over her head at something he saw coming over the grass toward him.
The next moment Jimmy whirled about, and the passengers saw him land his fist on the face of a running man who was trying to board the car.
The Greek scowled ferociously and shook his fist in his customary fashion.
I stopped the preliminary slap, but before I could hit him, his terrible left fist reached my head again; and down I fell once more--upon the hearth-rug this time--not over-heavily.
Even as she waxed impatient, the chance came, and Joe whipped his fist to Ponta's mouth.
I defy it," and he shook his fist in the ugly face of an Indian idol that happened to be before him, as if that particularly hideous god had some spite against his own little goddess.
The terror of Bishopriggs at the sight of Geoffrey's fist restored to him the activity of his youth.
If yer a gentleman, get up," quoth Patsy, his pale blue eyes aflame with wrath, his fist ready for a crushing blow.
This parson had been a champion in his youth, and had won much honour by his fist, both at school and at the university.
He threw one arm down to protect the stomach, the other arm up to protect the head; but Wolf Larsen's fist drove midway between, on the chest, with a crushing, resounding impact.
Then the woman slipped a rock the size of her fist into the stocking, and, brandishing this ancient and horrible weapon, lumbered into the nearest fray.
I am much obliged to you,' returned the old woman, testifying by a certain restlessness in her hands a vehement desire to shake her matronly fist at her son-in-law.
When he talked to George Willard, Wing Bid- dlebaum closed his fists and beat with them upon a table or on the walls of his house.
One matter connected with his management sometimes worried Nicholas, and that was his quick temper together with his old hussar habit of making free use of his fists.