firm

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stand firm

To remain determined, stalwart, and unyielding, as in one's position or opinion. Though it may be hard, we must stand firm in our pledge to environmental reform.
See also: firm, stand

hold firm

1. To remain securely adhered (to something). I didn't think the makeshift weld would do the trick, but I'm happy to say that it's holding firm.
2. To remain determined, stalwart, and unyielding, as in one's position or opinion. Though it may be hard, we must hold firm in our pledge to environmental reform.
See also: firm, hold

firm hand on the tiller

Full control over a situation. I felt comfortable knowing that even during this difficult time, he had a firm hand on the tiller.
See also: firm, hand, on, tiller

be a great believer in (something)

To have a strong conviction that something (stated after "in") is important or worthwhile. I'm a strong believer in resting on the weekends so that I don't get burned out.
See also: believer, great

be a firm believer in (something)

To have a strong conviction that something (stated after "in") is important or worthwhile. I'm a firm believer in resting on the weekends so that I don't get burned out.
See also: believer, firm

be on firm ground

To be certain of or comfortable with something. Anna can tutor you—she's on firm ground with diagramming sentences.
See also: firm, ground, on

take a firm stand (on or against something)

To publicly assert one's opinion or defense of or opposition to something without relenting. I know voicing my opinion on this legislation may put my job in jeopardy, but it's time to take a firm stand against these discriminatory hiring practices. Though an unpopular opinion, the principal took a firm stand on keeping classes separated by gender.
See also: firm, stand, take

take a firm line (on or against something)

To publicly assert one's opinion or defense of or opposition to something without relenting. I know voicing my opinion on this legislation may put my job in jeopardy, but it's time to take a firm line against these discriminatory hiring practices. Though an unpopular opinion, the principal took a firm line on keeping classes separated by gender.
See also: firm, line, take

*firm hand

Fig. [someone's] strong sense of management; a high degree of discipline and direction. (*Typically: exercise ~; have ~; need ~; take ~; use~.) I had to use a firm hand with Perry when he was a child. He had a problem with discipline.
See also: firm, hand

firm something up

 
1. Lit. to make something more stable or firm. We need to firm this table up. It is very wobbly. You need to use a whisk to firm up the egg whites.
2. Fig. to make a monetary offer for something more appealing and attractive and therefore more "solid" and likely to be accepted. You will have to firm the offer up with cash today, if you really want the house. Please firm up this offer if you still want the house.
See also: firm, up

firm up

 
1. Lit. to develop better muscle tone; to become less flabby. I need to do some exercises so I can firm up. You really ought to firm up.
2. Fig. to become more stable or viable; to recover from or stop a decline. The economy will probably firm up soon. I hope that cattle prices firm up next spring.
See also: firm, up

keep a firm grip on someone or something

 and keep a tight grip on someone or something 
1. Lit. to hold on to someone or something tightly. As they approached the edge, Sally kept a firm grip on little Timmy. She kept a tight grip on him. Keep a firm grip on my hand as we cross the street.
2. Fig. to keep someone or something under firm control. The manager keeps a firm grip on all the employees. I try to keep a firm grip on all the accounts.
See also: firm, grip, keep, on

take a firm grip on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to grasp someone or something tightly. The police officer took a firm grip on Fred and led him to the squad car. Mary took a firm grip on the handle and pulled hard.
2. Fig. to gain control of someone or something. You will have to take a firm grip on Andrew. He has a mind of his own. Someone needs to take a firm grip on this department and get it organized.
See also: firm, grip, on, take

be on firm ground

be sure of your facts or secure in your position, especially in a discussion.
See also: firm, ground, on

a firm hand

strict discipline or control.
Often used in the the fuller form, a firm hand on the reins (or the tiller ), this phrase is employing the image of controlling a horse by using the reins (or a boat using the tiller).
See also: firm, hand

be a great/firm believer in something

believe strongly that something is good, important or valuable: My mother was a great believer in horoscopes all her life.The boss was a firm believer in developing strong teamwork.

stand ˈfast/ˈfirm

refuse to move back; refuse to change your opinions or behaviour: The management have stood firm against demands for a pay increase. OPPOSITE: shift your ground
Fast here means ‘firmly fixed’.
See also: fast, firm, stand

be on firm ˈground

be sure about your beliefs, knowledge, etc.; be confident: I don’t know a lot about physics, I’m afraid. I’m on firmer ground with mathematics, which I studied at university.
See also: firm, ground, on

a firm ˈhand

strong discipline and control: What his son needs, if you ask me, is a firm hand!
See also: firm, hand

hold ˈfirm (to something)

(formal) believe something strongly and not change your mind: She held firm to her principles.
See also: firm, hold

take a firm ˈline/ˈstand (on/against something)

make your beliefs known and try to make others follow them: We need to take a firm line on tobacco advertising.They took a firm stand against drugs in the school.
See also: firm, line, stand, take

firm up

v.
1. To become firm or firmer: My vacation plans firmed up, so I bought airline tickets.
2. To cause something, such as a shape or a plan, to become definite or firm: I want to firm up our vacation plans before I call the travel agent. Let's firm our route up and get on the road.
See also: firm, up
References in periodicals archive ?
I find that the tube, when placed upright and held firmly against the player's spine, is just wide and solid enough to provide a temporary safe support--almost like a skinny chair back to release against.
Most of their activities required tremendous core strength with their feet firmly planted on the ground, and excellent balance was a requisite for success.
The company has found console boxes in those vehicles have not been firmly set, making it possible that the boxes open abruptly, thus hampering driving.
Despite this trend, after seeing three nieces and nephews receive Confirmation in second grade, four in eighth grade, and three in high school, I firmly believe that Confirmation has more of an impact on youth in their teen years.
As things stand, Germany, Latvia, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and the UK are firmly in favour of keeping the opt-out and Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, France, Finland, Greece and Spain are firmly against.
Rotate the upper element clockwise onto the lower element until the two elements are firmly attached.
It was February 2001, and the Dodgers were reporting to spring training with Tracy, formerly their bench coach, firmly in charge.
In the meantime, several channels will be duking it out alongside Logo for the once-invisible but now firmly coveted queer cable demographic.
One of the historical goals of creating the Community in 1957 would be destroyed, namely to anchor Germany firmly in the European Union and to achieve prosperity and peace in Europe.
The Madrid bombings in March 2004 suggested that al-Qaeda had fully reconstituted, set its sights firmly on the US and its closest western allies in Europe, and established a new and effective modus operandi that increasingly exploited local affiliates,' IISS director John Chipman told a central London press conference.
John Sydney's design JS2 has been named as the best brassware launch of 2003 by Bathroom Journal, which paid tribute to the company for successfully putting the John Sydney brand firmly back in the market.
The progressive impulse to encourage women to read because literacy provided them with "cultural scripts" that kept them firmly under the thumb of patriarchy was balanced by fear of the possibility they might co-opt them for subversive purposes.
We're serious underwriters, and we're firmly located in the mid-Atlantic.
Turn each apple upside-down, and firmly thrust a skewer through the soft flesh at the bottom up toward the stem.
LUKE Mitchell's mother Corinne has been firmly by her son's side since the discovery of Jodi's mutilated body two months ago.