find

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find

oneself Fig. to discover what one's talents and preferences are. Bill did better in school after he found himself. John tried a number of different jobs. He finally found himself when he became a cook.

find

(something) out (about someone or something) (from someone or something) to learn something about someone or something from someone or something. What did you find out about Terry from Mr. Franklin? I didn't find anything out about Roger from the newspaper stories. I found out what I wanted to know about solar flares from the encyclopedia. What did you find out about Bill?

find

(something) out the hard way Go to learn (something) the hard way.

find yourself

to discover your particular abilities and interests Only after she became an actress did she find herself.
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References in classic literature ?
One who pressed forward incessantly and never rested from his labors, who grew fast and made infinite demands on life, would always find himself in a new country or wilderness, and surrounded by the raw material of life.
You'll find they've been raked up and saved for you.
I find that the Count Angelo Capello is opposed to our creed--is a teetotaler, in fact, and was not intending to apply for membership with us.
A great stone that I happened to find, after a long search, by the sea-shore, served me for an anchor.
He wrote to us to desire that we would wait for him at Diou, in order to embark there for the Red Sea; but being informed by us that no opportunities of going thither were to be expected at Diou, it was at length determined that we should meet at Bazaim; it was no easy matter for me to find means of going to Bazaim.
We could not find Korak," replied the man, "and as our way led near my douar I have brought you here to wait and rest with my wife until my men can find your ape, or he finds you.
For such a prince cannot rely upon what he observes in quiet times, when citizens have need of the state, because then every one agrees with him; they all promise, and when death is far distant they all wish to die for him; but in troubled times, when the state has need of its citizens, then he finds but few.
They may have very good eyesight and all that; but when you ask them to find a man for you, they can't do it--and they have the cheek to come back and say that nobody else could do it.
I was wedged in between Redruth and a stout old gentleman, and in spite of the swift motion and the cold night air, I must have dozed a great deal from the very first, and then slept like a log up hill and down dale through stage after stage, for when I was awakened at last it was by a punch in the ribs, and I opened my eyes to find that we were standing still before a large building in a city street and that the day had already broken a long time.
So at last, submitting to our sad fate, we spent the day in wandering up and down the island eating such fruits as we could find, and when night came we returned to the castle, having sought in vain for any other place of shelter.
If you ever find Solomon's ring and get possession of it, then come back to me, that I may explain the inscription on the ring to you, for there is no one else in the world who can do this.
The Knight of the Rueful Countenance was still very anxious to find out who the owner of the valise could be, conjecturing from the sonnet and letter, from the money in gold, and from the fineness of the shirts, that he must be some lover of distinction whom the scorn and cruelty of his lady had driven to some desperate course; but as in that uninhabited and rugged spot there was no one to be seen of whom he could inquire, he saw nothing else for it but to push on, taking whatever road Rocinante chose- which was where he could make his way- firmly persuaded that among these wilds he could not fail to meet some rare adventure.
But I could find no saltpeter; indeed, no nitrates of any kind.
In truth, I expected nothing better than to find myself in the ditch on one side or the Quag on the other; but on communicating my apprehensions to Mr.
I shall drive there in my carriage at two o'clock in the afternoon for three successive days; the first day it will be drawn by four white, the second by four chestnut, and the last by four black horses; but if you fail to keep awake and I find you sleeping, I shall not be set free.