fill out


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fill out

to become full; to gain weight. About a month after her debilitating illness, Maggie began to fill out again. The fruit on the trees began to fill out, and we knew it was going to ripen soon.
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fill something out

Fig. to complete a form by writing in the blank spaces. Please fill this form out and send it back to us in the mail. I will fill out the form as you asked.
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fill out something

also fill something out
to provide information on paper or on a computer Please fill out the form before you call for an appointment. Print the document, fill it out, and bring it with you.
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fill out

1. Complete by supplying required information, especially in writing. For example, Please fill out the application form, or I don't quite understand this drawing, so fill out the details. [Late 1800s]
2. Become enlarged, distended, rounded in outline. For example, The wind filled out the sails, or He's put on weight and really filled out. Applied to objects, this expression dates from about 1700, but to persons or animals becoming fatter, only from the late 1800s.
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fill out

v.
1. To provide required information in written form on something, such as a document: She carefully filled out the job application. He filled the voter registration form out.
2. To become larger, fuller, or fatter: The child filled out after he reached puberty.
3. To cause something to become larger, fuller, or fatter: The reporter filled out the article with extra anecdotes. The speaker filled the lecture out with a slide show.
4. To be large enough to fit some article of clothing properly: You don't really fill out that dress—it is a little baggy in places.
See also: fill, out