felt

(redirected from felts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

feel honor-bound to do something

To feel obliged to do something because it is morally correct or required by one's sense of duty or integrity, even if one does not desire to do so. Primarily heard in US. It pains me to turn you in to the police, my friend, but I feel honor-bound to inform them of your actions.
See also: feel

feel like a million bucks

To feel exceptionally attractive or in very robust health. Wow, I feel like a million bucks in this new suit! I guess fluids and rest were all I needed to beat that cold. I'm already feeling like a million bucks compared to yesterday!
See also: buck, feel, like, million

feel like a million dollars

To feel exceptionally attractive or in very robust health. Wow, I feel like a million dollars in this new suit! I guess fluids and rest were all I needed to beat that cold. I'm already feeling like a million dollars compared to yesterday!
See also: dollar, feel, like, million

feel out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of humour in the morning.
See also: feel, humour, of, out

feel out of sorts

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of sorts lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of sorts in the morning.
See also: feel, of, out, sort

feel (like) (one)self

To feel as one normally does, physically or emotionally. I'm finally starting to feel like myself again after my bout with the flu. Marcy has been struggling with depression lately—I hope she feels herself again soon.
See also: feel

feel as if a cat has kittened in (one's) mouth

To feel very hungover (with an awful taste in one's mouth). A: "You don't look so good. How are you feeling after your night of partying?" B: "Ugh, I feel as if a cat has kittened in my mouth." A long night of drinking will leave you feeling as if a cat has kittened in your mouth.
See also: cat, feel, if, kitten, mouth

feel it in (one's) bones

To sense something strongly and intuitively. Please stay home tonight—this storm is going to be bad, I feel it in my bones. I know you don't agree with her decision, but she feels it in her bones that this is the best thing to do.
See also: bone, feel

feel small

To feel insignificant or see oneself negatively. After that disastrous meeting with my boss, I've never felt so small in my life. He is such a jerk and always insults her so that she feels small.
See also: feel, small

feel the draught

To be in a situation in which one does not have much money. Steve is feeling the draught right now and wants to know if we can go out next week instead, after he gets paid. If I get laid off, I know it won't be long before I feel the draught.
See also: feel

I felt like a penny waiting for change.

Rur. I felt worthless or helpless. When I lost the race, I felt like a penny waiting for change. My best girl went off with someone else. I felt like a penny waiting for change.
See also: change, felt, like, penny, waiting

(I've) never been better.

 and (I've) never felt better.
a response to a greeting inquiry into one's health or state of being. Mary: How are you, Sally? Sally: Never been better, Mary. How about you? Doctor: How are you, Jane? Jane: Never felt better. Doctor: Then why are you here?
See also: been, better, never

make your presence felt

to have a strong effect on other people or on a situation Hockney made his presence felt in the New York art world shortly after he arrived there. The rebels have already made their bloody presence felt during the election campaign.
See also: felt, make, presence

I've never [felt/heard/seen etc.] something in all my (born) days!

  (old-fashioned)
something that you say when you are shocked or very surprised by something There were two men kissing in the street. I've never seen anything like it in all my born days!
See also: all, never

make your presence felt

to have a strong effect on other people or on a situation The new police chief has really made his presence felt.
See also: felt, make, presence
References in classic literature ?
And now that an angry unsympathetic little girl insisted obstinately that he was not as ill as he thought he was he actually felt as if she might be speaking the truth.
As he contemplated him, the youth felt his heart grow more strong and stout.
After this incident, and as he reviewed the battle pictures he had seen, he felt quite com- petent to return home and make the hearts of the people glow with stories of war.
She felt her own weakness, and would repose it on the manly strength of Antonio.
Julia felt indignant at the freedom of his manner, and particularly at the epithet of "Tony"--yet her lover did not in the least regard either--or rather his manner exhibited no symptoms of displeasure--he has made up his mind, thought Julia, to support his disguise, and it is best for us both that he should.
And now, when he opened the door, there was the candle burnt out in the socket; there was the chair in the same place where Adam remembered sitting; there was the waste-paper basket full of scraps, and deep down in it, Arthur felt in an instant, there was the little pink silk handkerchief.
Poor Arthur felt that Adam ought to be affected by this announcement--ought to have a movement of sympathy towards him.
He had been coming to it, all hesitating, for some time, but only now was conscious of the fact; he felt himself on the brink of a discovery.
Lydgate was fuming a little, pushed his hair back with one hand, felt curiously in his waistcoat-pocket with the other, and then stooped to beckon the tiny black spaniel, which had the insight to decline his hollow caresses.
Kasatsky felt that he was neither in his own hands nor in God's, but was subject to something else.
He felt that he had not the strength to go off in search of a house.
I can put them in my pocket if I feel too much dressed," said Polly as she snapped on the bracelets, but after a wave or two of the fan she felt that it would be impossible to take them off till the evening was over, so enticing was their glitter.
At times, this secret consciousness marred the delight of their comradeship; at others it was almost forgotten; but Anne always felt the hidden thorn was there, and might prick her at any moment.
I must own I felt so well content yesterday after the Shtcherbatskys' that I didn't care to go anywhere.
She felt quite charitably toward young Torry, as his hand bore her along and held her up in the dance; her eyes and cheeks had that fire of young joy in them which will flame out if it can find the least breath to fan it; and her simple black dress, with its bit of black lace, seemed like the dim setting of a jewel.