felt


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Related to felt: trek

feel honor-bound to do something

To feel obliged to do something because it is morally correct or required by one's sense of duty or integrity, even if one does not desire to do so. Primarily heard in US. It pains me to turn you in to the police, my friend, but I feel honor-bound to inform them of your actions.
See also: feel

feel like a million bucks

To feel exceptionally attractive or in very robust health. Wow, I feel like a million bucks in this new suit! I guess fluids and rest were all I needed to beat that cold. I'm already feeling like a million bucks compared to yesterday!
See also: buck, feel, like, million

feel like a million dollars

To feel exceptionally attractive or in very robust health. Wow, I feel like a million dollars in this new suit! I guess fluids and rest were all I needed to beat that cold. I'm already feeling like a million dollars compared to yesterday!
See also: dollar, feel, like, million

feel out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of humour in the morning.
See also: feel, humour, of, out

feel out of sorts

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of sorts lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of sorts in the morning.
See also: feel, of, out, sort

feel (like) (one)self

To feel as one normally does, physically or emotionally. I'm finally starting to feel like myself again after my bout with the flu. Marcy has been struggling with depression lately—I hope she feels herself again soon.
See also: feel

feel as if a cat has kittened in (one's) mouth

To feel very hungover (with an awful taste in one's mouth). A: "You don't look so good. How are you feeling after your night of partying?" B: "Ugh, I feel as if a cat has kittened in my mouth." A long night of drinking will leave you feeling as if a cat has kittened in your mouth.
See also: cat, feel, if, kitten, mouth

feel it in (one's) bones

To sense something strongly and intuitively. Please stay home tonight—this storm is going to be bad, I feel it in my bones. I know you don't agree with her decision, but she feels it in her bones that this is the best thing to do.
See also: bone, feel

feel small

To feel insignificant or see oneself negatively. After that disastrous meeting with my boss, I've never felt so small in my life. He is such a jerk and always insults her so that she feels small.
See also: feel, small

feel the draught

To be in a situation in which one does not have much money. Steve is feeling the draught right now and wants to know if we can go out next week instead, after he gets paid. If I get laid off, I know it won't be long before I feel the draught.
See also: feel

I felt like a penny waiting for change.

Rur. I felt worthless or helpless. When I lost the race, I felt like a penny waiting for change. My best girl went off with someone else. I felt like a penny waiting for change.
See also: change, felt, like, penny, waiting

(I've) never been better.

 and (I've) never felt better.
a response to a greeting inquiry into one's health or state of being. Mary: How are you, Sally? Sally: Never been better, Mary. How about you? Doctor: How are you, Jane? Jane: Never felt better. Doctor: Then why are you here?
See also: been, better, never

make your presence felt

to have a strong effect on other people or on a situation Hockney made his presence felt in the New York art world shortly after he arrived there. The rebels have already made their bloody presence felt during the election campaign.
See also: felt, make, presence

I've never [felt/heard/seen etc.] something in all my (born) days!

  (old-fashioned)
something that you say when you are shocked or very surprised by something There were two men kissing in the street. I've never seen anything like it in all my born days!
See also: all, never

make your presence felt

to have a strong effect on other people or on a situation The new police chief has really made his presence felt.
See also: felt, make, presence
References in classic literature ?
the time when that dependence and hope utterly left me, when the sadness I had felt in Bertha's growing estrangement became a joy that I looked back upon with longing as a man might look back on the last pains in a paralysed limb.
For Bertha too, after her kind, felt the bitterness of disillusion.
Meunier had now a European reputation; but his letter to me expressed that keen remembrance of an early regard, an early debt of sympathy, which is inseparable from nobility of character: and I too felt as if his presence would be to me like a transient resurrection into a happier pre-existence.
She started forward as she saw me enter, and then looked at Meunier with an expression of angry inquiry; but he lifted up his hand as it to impose silence, while he fixed his glance on the dying woman and felt her pulse.
Now he felt that it was inevitable, but he could not make up his mind to take the final step.
he said, remembering what has to be said at such moments: but his words sounded so weak that he felt ashamed of himself.
Casaubon, and she had felt the waking of a presentiment that there might be a sad consciousness in his life which made as great a need on his side as on her own.
Polly was not very wise, but she felt that every one about her found something more attractive than usual in her and modestly attributed Tom's devotion, Sydney's interest, and Frank's undisguised admiration, to the new bonnet or, more likely, to that delightful combination of cashmere, silk, and swan's-down, which, like Charity's mantle, seemed to cover a multitude of sins in other people's eyes and exalt the little music teacher to the rank of a young lady.
Polly scoffed at this sort of thing sometimes, but to-night she accepted it without a murmur rather enjoyed it in fact, let her bracelets shine before the eyes of all men, and felt that it was good to seem comely in their sight.
These thoughts came and went as he watched the white figure in front, felt the enchantment of the music, and found everybody unusually blithe and beautiful.
And that night I felt that a merciless hand was drawing me back into the cage--back to a torture even more terrible than it had once been.
A gust of wind struck upon the nape of Jukes' neck and next moment he felt it streaming about his wet ankles.
She felt that the parting could not be effected suddenly.
Remember what you felt weeks ago," she began, with beseeching earnestness; "remember what we both felt,--that we owed ourselves to others, and must conquer every inclination which could make us false to that debt.
If we--if I had been better, nobler, those claims would have been so strongly present with me,--I should have felt them pressing on my heart so continually, just as they do now in the moments when my conscience is awake,--that the opposite feeling would never have grown in me, as it has done; it would have been quenched at once, I should have prayed for help so earnestly, I should have rushed away as we rush from hideous danger.