fellow traveler


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fellow traveler

Someone sympathetic to the beliefs and activities of an organization but not a member of that group. The phrase originally applied to people in the early days of the Soviet Union who supported the Russian revolution and the Communist Party but were not members. Communism was popular among many American intellectuals during the 1930s and '40s, but following World War II, this country's attitude toward the Soviets changed in light of Stalin's purges and revelations of espionage. Accusations that Soviet sympathizers had infiltrated our government and military led to congressional investigations, and the phrase “fellow traveler” was used to label those accused of “un-American” activities or even just “Communist dupes.” Many such people found themselves blacklisted or otherwise persecuted. A rarely used vestige of the phrase now applies to anyone who agrees with any viewpoint or faction but does not publicly work for it. The Soviet Union named its early space satellites “Sputnik,” the Russian word for “fellow traveler.”
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Minister of State for Railway, Shri Manoj Sinha said that the Indian Railways is on a transformative journey and it looks forward to using social media as a platform to tell its stories and constantly hear from fellow travelers.
But at cruising altitude, we want to leave our cares, and certainly those of fellow travelers, below.
though not really a new invention, has been popularized by some as a tool to get fellow travelers to get out of the way.
Hey, fellow travelers, consider this Y2K bug: Dates for next year's Housewares and Builders' Shows conflict.
Recent book-length studies of the controversial Nation of Islam leader have been penned by the American Jewish Committee's chief legal expert on anti-semitism, a self-proclaimed "liberal-integrationist-feminist writer and sometimes integrationist and feminist activist," a Swedish anthropologist of religion, and the author of a guide to "etiquette in other people's religious ceremonies" To be sure, these are not exactly Islamic fellow travelers or brothers on the block.
National groups and local activists, of which I was one, seemed to be holding at bay the book burners, anti-abortionists, militarists, and a host of fellow travelers.
Although moderated by CityPASS, the company that saves travelers up to 50 percent on attraction admission costs in 11 North American cities, the bulk of City Traveler's content -- including photos, videos, stories and reviews -- is generated by fellow travelers.
com's international travel experts, partner sites, input from fellow travelers and friends and users' own preferences, making old-style guidebooks virtually obsolete.
Rice and her fellow travelers, like the ACLU, think of police use of force in this context: Any use of force is excessive.
Upon questioning, she mentioned that in Chobe National Park, some fellow travelers had manipulated the legs of dead antelopes.
Seven empty beaches offer lots of opportunities for seaside soirees or nude sunbathing with no one but your fellow travelers and a passing seagull to watch.
Coulter's sweeping generalizations, which can't distinguish Democratic Cold Warriors from Democratic fellow travelers, have alienated even some of her usual supporters (though not Hannity).
Soon after, Abrams and 74 fellow travelers condemned the ADL in a New York Times ad, complaining: "It ill behooves an organization dedicated to fighting against defamation to engage in defamation of its own.
Gordon and Mark from Michigan should be given the Medal of Freedom, not subject to attacks from fellow travelers like those Pinko Clintons.
Fellow travelers in the realm of grand theory may suspect, however, that he has rediscovered the civilizing mission of Methodism among the working class and the triumphant (if never uncontested) rise of the bourgeoisie.
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