feel

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References in classic literature ?
Mary, I don't know how you'd feel about it, but there's that drawer full of things--of--of--poor little Henry's.
The burden is no longer heavy when we have for our past troubles only the same sweet mingling of pleasure and pity that we feel when old knight-hearted Colonel Newcome answers "
On Saturday, you are able to swallow a little beef tea, and to sit up on deck, and answer with a wan, sweet smile when kind-hearted people ask you how you feel now.
You will feel very differently after you get over being tired and bewildered," said Anne, who, knowing a certain thing that Leslie did not know, did not feel herself called upon to waste overmuch sympathy.
He had the uneasy consciousness that he had robbed her of perfect freedom yesterday; there was too much native honor in him, for him not to feel that, if her will should recoil, his conduct would have been odious, and she would have a right to reproach him.
She'll be em- barrassed and feel strange when I'm around," he whispered to himself.
Hall," she said, with a faint attempt at a smile, "we are old friends, and I feel I can ask you a favor.
It certainly did feel queer; but I must say I felt rather proud to carry my master, and as he continued to ride me a little every day I soon became accustomed to it.
I had been suffering for many weary weeks past such remorse as only miserable women like me can feel.
Permit me to ask you to feel and be felt by my friend Mr.
Good-bye, Little Weena," I said, kissing her; and then putting her down, I began to feel over the parapet for the climbing hooks.
Ah," sighed Caderousse, "a man cannot always feel happy because he is about to be married.
To tell you the truth, I had supposed that YOU were jesting in your letter; wherefore, my heart was feeling heavy at the thought that you could feel so displeased with me.
Does a passenger ever feel the life of the ship in which he is being carried like a sort of honoured bale of highly sensitive goods?
But it is not in human nature--only in human pretence--for a young man like Arthur, with a fine constitution and fine spirits, thinking well of himself, believing that others think well of him, and having a very ardent intention to give them more and more reason for that good opinion--it is not possible for such a young man, just coming into a splendid estate through the death of a very old man whom he was not fond of, to feel anything very different from exultant joy.