feeling

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*feeling (that something is the case)

 and *a feeling about something
a premonition that [something might happen or be the case]; an intuition about something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) I had a feeling that you might be dropping by this afternoon. I didn't have any facts to support it. I just had a feeling.
See:
References in classic literature ?
But feeling overmuch about her has perhaps made me unfair to you.
Ah, sir," said Adam, for the first time feeling his own pain merged in sympathy for Arthur, "you and me'll often be thinking o' the same thing, when we're a long way off one another.
I know that's what they'll feel, and I can't help feeling a little of it myself.
The hands were clasped once more, and Adam left the Hermitage, feeling that sorrow was more bearable now hatred was gone.
We have this feeling normally in places where we have often been before--at home, or in well-known streets.
She paused, and saw with no slight indignation that he was listening with an air which proved him wholly unmoved by any feeling of remorse.
Who that knows what his misfortunes have been, can help feeling an interest in him?
I walked without feeling the ground as I trod on it; I looked about me with no distinct consciousness of what the objects were on which my eyes rested.
In spite of his intended silence, Sir Thomas found himself once more obliged to mention the subject to his niece, to prepare her briefly for its being imparted to her aunts; a measure which he would still have avoided, if possible, but which became necessary from the totally opposite feelings of Mr.
If her aunt's feelings were against her, nothing could be hoped from attacking her understanding.
She must have a sensation of being honoured, and whether thinking of herself or her brother, she must have a strong feeling of gratitude.
How evidently was there a gross want of feeling and humanity where his own pleasure was concerned; and alas
He said he had been feeling very lonely in his trial; but I think he would have borne it all better if he had been able to be quite open with you.
She was too much preoccupied with her own anxiety, to be aware that Rosamond was trembling too; and filled with the need to express pitying fellowship rather than rebuke, she put her hands on Rosamond's, and said with more agitated rapidity,--"I know, I know that the feeling may be very dear--it has taken hold of us unawares--it is so hard, it may seem like death to part with it--and we are weak--I am weak--"
She stopped in speechless agitation, not crying, but feeling as if she were being inwardly grappled.