feeling

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*feeling (that something is the case)

 and *a feeling about something
a premonition that [something might happen or be the case]; an intuition about something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) I had a feeling that you might be dropping by this afternoon. I didn't have any facts to support it. I just had a feeling.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I see it feelingly," he plays out the "how-tos" of a process he calls actorly reading.
As a lover, with a moment of critical distance from the TRC, Krog feelingly ponders the ethical uncertainties and demands of writing others' testimonies.
Prynne's enthusiastic readers should approach his poems as Gloucester approaches Dover, feelingly, letting go of the need to see the route and determinedly master it.
This is entirely appropriate in the rest of the book, which feelingly captures the most important relationship in Woolf's life--his 30-year marriage to Virginia--with finesse and wisdom.
complexion, he shall find himself most feelingly personated.
Barakova recognizes feelingly the yawing gap between robotics and human behavior.
Sassoon would eventually repay the sport for everything it gave him: it has never been more feelingly eulogized than in his lovely Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man.
It's difficult to explain," he says feelingly, "but sometimes when I think back on it I get the shivers.
Marx, in Capital, wrote feelingly about nineteenth-century movements for factory legislation and the ten-hours bill, describing the latter as a great victory for the political economy of the working class.
I can remember old fellows in my home town speaking feelingly of an evening spent on the big empty plains.
At other times, however, Said clearly assumes that there is a real Orient and feelingly condemns the ways in which coercive, aggressive, and oppressive orientalists have misrepresented the Orient.
Because Charles is blind, he can only "see feelingly," that is, by touch; and although Janice might function at times as his surrogate eyes out onto the world, she serves that function for the inessentials only.
In "Toward Lost Letters" Teare states, "All my life I've remained the student I who "thinks feelingly,' a professor once wrote.
1) Herbert Tucker makes this point feelingly in "A Victorianist Squints at Y2K," JPRS 9 (Spring 2000): 5-11.
After reading Fictions of Disease, one can truthfully say of even the most fleeting Shakespearean reference to a 'pil'd pate', I see it feelingly.