feel small


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feel small

To feel insignificant or see oneself negatively. After that disastrous meeting with my boss, I've never felt so small in my life. He is such a jerk and always insults her so that she feels small.
See also: feel, small

look/feel ˈsmall

(also feel ˈthat high) feel stupid, embarrassed or ridiculous in front of other people: Why did you tell everyone that I’d failed all my school exams? I felt so small.Mrs Jones made him feel that high when she criticized his work in front of everybody.
When using the expression feel that high, you often use your thumb and finger to indicate something small.
See also: feel, look, small
References in periodicals archive ?
Only now can the old dog look back and realize that my dad's questions weren't intended to make me feel small.
One character complains that her American friend takes up too much "room" and wants her to be large, too, but ends up making her feel small.
I feel Small has a legitimate excuse," manager Brian Laws told the club's official website, www.
They got odd couple Ellie and Lester, below, to open up about their sex lives without making them feel small (except for Lester - he was 5ft 4in, she was 5ft 11in.
Many have said that they feel small commercial streets are being squeezed out so that land can be developed into flats etc.
I feel small business people like myself deserve an opportunity to be involved in the city centre regeneration.
While she realizes she can't reconstruct a nation, she says "The world and its problems make you feel small, but we are all c apable of making a huge difference.
It's no task to feel small at the awareness that the majority will
Both Sweden and the UK feel small vessels with a historically small catch will be discriminated against as the vessel capacity permitted per Member State will be based on landing more than 10 tonnes of any mixture of deep-sea species in 1998, 1999 or 2000.
One who testified declared, "Phil's substance was wide and deep," and cited as most apt in Phil's case, "A great man can make any man feel small.
We so often feel small and weak, inadequate, a minority, for the most part marginalized and ignored in modern society.
The other songs, such as "How Is It (We Are Here)," "Don't You Feel Small," "It's Up to You," and the concluding "Balance," share a similar feeling of unaffected directness.
Love--what one narrator calls "a word from a dead language"--functions in Rakusa's postmodern world as focal point for a reappraisal of sexual politics and metaphor for established power of whatever sort: "He who swings the whip may not despair"; "At least behave as though the status quo were the most peaceful of all possibilities"; "made to feel small, smaller, smallest, as gnomes we are controllable.
That monster is Frankenstein, the teasing romantic evocation of humanity's ultimate fears about science's ability to reduce humankind to an object of study; to reduce our notions of determinism, causality, free will; to rob us of ourselves and our hopes of salvation; to make us feel small.