feel (like) (one)self

(redirected from feel herself)

feel (like) (one)self

To feel as one normally does, physically or emotionally. I'm finally starting to feel like myself again after my bout with the flu. Marcy has been struggling with depression lately—I hope she feels herself again soon.
See also: feel
References in classic literature ?
Miss Clack is painfully conscious that she ought (in the worldly phrase) to feel herself put down.
She did earn several that year, and began to feel herself a power in the house, for by the magic of a pen, her `rubbish' turned into comforts for them all.
But it did her good, for those whose opinion had real value gave her the critism which is an author's best education, and when the first soreness was over, she could laugh at her poor little book, yet believe in it still, and feel herself the wiser and stronger for the buffeting she had received.
The Co Carlow girl added she can feel herself "growing every day" into her new Broadway role.
While having her own child isn't on the cards at the moment, Ora said she could feel herself getting motherly over her chosen acts - and her fellow judge Cowell - on the ITV show.
From being someone who was so active she wanted things 'done yesterday', Yuthar said she can feel herself slowing down.
Raven can feel herself falling in love, but can she trust a boy she knows almost nothing about?
Regardless of how we are treated by any given generation, and cognizant of our own personal sinfulness, the Church will always feel herself mandated by God to preach and teach the Truth: that Jesus Christ is the Way, the Truth and the Life.
Another woman told the court she could feel herself being sexually touched as woke up and said it would only stop when a female nurse came in the room.
About halfway through we abandon Clemons and his stoop and watch Gaga grind and feel herself up on a fire escape.
Iwan said: "She would feel herself becoming unwell and she would sit down or lie down.
Ultimately, Maxine Brown from Kingstree, South Carolina, should feel herself hard done by that her original superb version of If You Gotta Make a Fool Of Somebody was not a hit.
As Jean pores over evidence from the famous 19th century murder trial, she begins to feel herself losing control of her own life.
Marian Evans's assumption of a male narrative persona does indeed entail more than mere expediency, since while adopting this convenient disguise she is obliged to feel herself into a male condition of desiring.
At 32, she must feel herself too young to be without affection.