fault

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at fault

to blame [for something]; serving as the cause of something bad. I was not at fault in the accident. You cannot blame me.
See also: fault

fault someone (for something)

to blame or criticize someone for something. I can't fault you for that. I would have done the same thing. He tended to fault himself for the failure of the project.

find fault (with someone or something)

to find things wrong with someone or something. We were unable to find fault with his arguments. Sally's father was always finding fault with her.
See also: fault, find

generous to a fault

Cliché too generous; overly generous. My favorite uncle is generous to a fault. Sallyalways generous to a fault—gave away her lunch to a homeless man.
See also: fault, generous

to a fault

more than is necessary She was generous to a fault, taking me out to dinner and buying me expensive gifts.
Usage notes: used after an adjective that describes one of someone's good characteristics
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to a fault

if someone is generous or has another good quality to a fault, they are very generous or have more of that good quality than other people Nigel was generous to a fault, taking me out to dinner and buying me flowers and chocolates.
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at fault

Responsible for a mistake, trouble, or failure; deserving blame. For example, At least three cars were involved in the accident, so it was hard to determine which driver was at fault , or He kept missing the target and wondered if the sight on his new rifle was at fault. In Britain this usage was formerly considered incorrect but is now acceptable; in America it has been widespread since the mid-1800s. Also see in the wrong.
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find fault

Criticize, express dissatisfaction with, as in She was a difficult traveling companion, constantly finding fault with the hotel, meal service, and tour guides . [Mid-1500s]
See also: fault, find

to a fault

Excessively, extremely, as in He was generous to a fault. This phrase, always qualifying an adjective, has been so used since the mid-1700s. Indeed, Oliver Goldsmith had this precise usage in The Life of Richard Nash (1762).
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at fault

1. Deserving of blame; guilty: admitted to being at fault.
2. Confused and puzzled.
See also: fault

find fault

To seek, find, and complain about faults; criticize: found fault with his speech.
See also: fault, find

to a fault

To an excessive degree: generous to a fault.
See also: fault
References in classic literature ?
The fault of Euphemia is that she will not, simply will not, chop the suet sufficiently small.
Then hang up Fangs,'' said Cedric, turning hastily towards the swineherd, ``if the fault is his, and get thee another dog.
Under favour, uncle,'' said the Jester, ``that were still somewhat on the bow-hand of fair justice; for it was no fault of Fangs that he was lame and could not gather the herd, but the fault of those that struck off two of his fore-claws, an operation for which, if the poor fellow had been consulted, he would scarce have given his voice.
Ozma thinks that one who has committed a fault did so because he was not strong and brave; therefore she puts him in prison to make him strong and brave.
It is true that the latter had assumed much more of the fault than was rightly his, but if he lied a little he may be excused, for he lied in the service of a woman, and he lied like a gentleman.
Persons don't make their own faces, and it's no more my fault if mine is a good one than it is other people's fault if theirs is a bad one.
although I told you, last night, it was not my fault.
It's your fault, and five months ago you admitted it.
And the most awful thing about it is that it's all my fault--all my fault, though I'm not to blame.
He did not succeed in adapting his face to the position in which he was placed towards his wife by the discovery of his fault.
You'll have niver a penny, my boy--but it isn't your poor mother's fault.
Tom, you ought to say so too; you ought not to let any one find fault with my father.
Analyzing system status, identifying possible faults, and arriving at diagnosis decision rapidly in complex system environment are challenging tasks even for skilled and experienced engineers.
Abstract: Fault statistics show that single-phase-to-earth faults (briefly called earth faults) are the most common faults in electricity distribution networks.
Those data suggest that faults can rupture at speeds exceeding 3.