fatty

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fatty

n. a derogatory nickname for a fat person. (Cruel. Also a rude term of address.) Okay, fatty, you get the biggest piece of cake because you deserve it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beer is a food, so remember basic interactive culinary principals when pairing: sweet, sour, spice, salt, bitter, fattiness, heat and cold interact with each other and with the level of alcohol, bitter, sweet, malt and roasted elements in beer.
Bacon is a wonderful cut to boil as it's the hock off a gammon joint; the fattiness of it allows the meat to stay incredibly moist while also imparting a fine flavour.
Recommendations: Barossa Valley Estate Ebenezer from Australia or Clos La Chance from Santa Cruz Mountains -- The fattiness of Christmas goose or roast duck balances well with a pinot noir because of the wine's tart fruit and clean finish.
Honey works well with duck, as does anything sweet, to counter the fattiness of the meat, while the coriander and orange salad is light, fragrant and tasty.
By cooking food in its own juices, you get the sensation of richness and fattiness.
It's exacerbated by vacuum packaging and by the extra fattiness of farmed fish.
50) which was delicious - very full, with a fattiness which made the characteristic goosebery taste more like creamy gooseberry crumble.
The chocolate should be thick, rich and bitter, in order to counteract the intense sweet fattiness of the dipped churro.
Easter Sunday lunch, lamb and claret are traditional companions - partly because the wine's tannic twist neutralises any fattiness in the meat.
Since the sausage was prepared separately, the meaty flavors did not interfere with the sauce or add excess fattiness to the penne pasta.
Chunky slices of pickled cucumber helped cut through the fattiness and tried to add piquancy to the dish, but it struggled to lift it beyond bland.
It was demonstrated that the carcass weight was an important factor affecting meat quality through its effect on fattiness Hilton et al.
A good bitter ale goes perfectly with strong flavoured cheeses because the carbonation in the beer and the bitterness of the beer actually cuts through the fattiness of the cheese which doesn't really happen with wine.
Despite the supposed fattiness of duck, we don't need too much bitterness and cutting power here; we need something more subtle, almost sneaky.