References in classic literature ?
I turned and galloped to the further side of the meadow as fast as I could go, and there I stood snorting with astonishment and fear.
There was a little gray in the sky now; so I stepped into the woods, and laid down for a nap before break- fast.
And in a moment the Doctor found himself traveling so fast he had to hold his hat on with both hands; for he felt as though the ship itself were flying through waves that frothed and boiled with speed.
He would put me in prison, and would have all of you murdered; keep your own counsel therefore; buy your merchandise as fast as you can, and send me word when you have done loading.
Almost each morning a letter from my owners would arrive, directing me to go to the charterers and clamour for the ship's cargo; to threaten them with the heaviest penalties of demurrage; to demand that this assortment of varied merchandise, set fast in a landscape of ice and windmills somewhere up-country, should be put on rail instantly, and fed up to the ship in regular quantities every day.
But whenever there is danger, my heart begins to beat fast.
Then lift her quickly on to the horse behind you; clap your spurs to his side, and gallop away as fast as you can.
He was not going very fast, but on his flanks specks of foam began to appear and at times he would tremble like a leaf.
Then the boy stretched himself upon the grass beside the Pumpkinhead, and being greatly wearied by the journey was soon fast asleep.
The logs which bore them floated in the middle of the stream and were held fast in that position by the strong current.
When it is all out, stretching directly across the stream, the men make their boat fast to one end of the net and drift along with it.
The shaggy man pulled the sail way up, and they flew so fast over the Deadly Desert that every one held fast to the sides of the boat and scarcely dared to breathe.
When the Political Pull had arrived, the Ox said: "My good friend, please make fast to me, and let nature take her course.
When the waves began to tumble and toss and to grow bigger and bigger the ship rolled up and down, and tipped sidewise--first one way and then the other--and was jostled around so roughly that even the sailor-men had to hold fast to the ropes and railings to keep themselves from being swept away by the wind or pitched headlong into the sea.
When Gerda had warmed herself, and had eaten and drunk, the Lapland woman wrote a few words on a dried haberdine, begged Gerda to take care of them, put her on the Reindeer, bound her fast, and away sprang the animal.