farm

(redirected from farms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

fat farm

A slightly derogatory term for a clinic, treatment center, or resort that is aimed at helping people lose weight. My weight ballooned after the inactivity that resulted from my surgery, so I'm heading to the fat farm this summer to try to get it back to normal.
See also: farm, fat

bought the farm

Died. Did you hear that old Walt bought the farm? What a shame—at least he got to spend 92 years on this earth.
See also: bought, farm

funny farm

Derogatory slang for a psychiatric hospital or mental health facility. If I don't take a vacation soon, I'll be headed to the funny farm.
See also: farm, funny

bet the farm

To risk everything on a venture that one thinks will be successful. Primarily heard in US. I wouldn't bet the farm on that wacky invention. He's broke now because he bet the farm on a failed business venture.
See also: bet, farm

buy it

1. slang To believe that something is true. My brother says that his latest scheme will make millions, but I'm not buying it. I told the teacher that my dog ate my homework, and she totally bought it! At least I think she did.
2. slang To die. When Ray got back last night, he told the boss that the informant bought it and won't be a problem anymore.
See also: buy

buy the farm

slang To die. Did you hear that old Walt bought the farm? What a shame—at least he got to spend 92 years on this earth.
See also: buy, farm

factory farming

An inexpensive and efficient system of farming in which animals are fed for growth and kept in small pens. Can we implement a system that is more humane than factory farming?
See also: factory, farm

farm out

1. To cause land to become infertile from excessive farming. A noun or pronoun can be used between "farm" and "out." If we plant crops here again this season, we run the risk of farming out the field.
2. To assign work to someone or something outside of the person or company of origin. A noun or pronoun can be used between "farm" and "out." We decided to farm this filing project out to another company because we didn't have any employees to spare for it.
3. To place one's child in someone else's care. A noun or pronoun can be used between "farm" and "out." Since our anniversary is this weekend, do you think we can farm the kids out to your parents?
4. To have an employee to work for someone else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "farm" and "out." I can't farm out my assistant, I'd be lost without her!
5. In baseball, to send a major-league player to the minors. A noun or pronoun can be used between "farm" and "out." I know I haven't had a great season so far, but I never expected management to farm me out.
See also: farm, out

buy the farm

 and buy it
Sl. to die; to get killed. (The farm is a burial plot.) I'll pass through this illness; I'm too young to buy the farm. He lived for a few hours after his collapse, but then he bought it.
See also: buy, farm

farm someone out

 
1. [for someone in control] to send someone to work for someone else. I have farmed my electrician out for a week, so your work will have to wait. We farmed out the office staff.
2. to send a child away to be cared for by someone; to send a child to boarding school. We farmed the kids out to my sister for the summer. We farmed out the kids.
See also: farm, out

farm something out

 
1. to deplete the fertility of land by farming too intensely. They farmed their land out through careless land management. They farmed out their land.
2. to send work to someone to be done away from one's normal place of business; to subcontract work. We farmed the assembly work out. We always farm out the actual final assembly of the finished units.
See also: farm, out

sell the farm

 and bet the farm
Fig. to liquidate all one's assets in order to raise money to invest in something. It's a risky proposition. I wouldn't bet the farm on it.
See also: farm, sell

You can bet the farm (on someone or something).

Rur. You can be certain of someone or something. This is a good investment. You can bet the farm on it. You can bet the farm that Joe is gonna get that job.
See also: bet, can, farm

buy it

1. Suffer a severe reversal, as in If they can't raise the money in time, they'll buy it. [Slang; mid-1900s]
2. Be killed; die. For example, By the time we could get to the hospital, he had bought it. Originating during World War I as military slang, this term later was extended to peacetime forms of death. A later slang equivalent is buy the farm, dating from about 1950. For example, He'll soon buy the farm riding that motorcycle. According to J.E. Lighter, it alludes to training flights crashing in a farmer's field, causing the farmer to sue the government for damages sufficient to pay off the farm's mortgage. Since the pilot usually died in such a crash, he in effect bought the farm with his life.
3. Believe it; see buy something.
See also: buy

buy the farm

see under buy it.
See also: buy, farm

farm out

Assign something to an outsider; subcontract something. For example, The contractor was so busy he had to farm out two jobs to a colleague, or When their mother was hospitalized, the children had to be farmed out to the nearest relatives . This term originally referred to letting or leasing land. Today it usually refers to subcontracting work or the care of a dependent to another. In baseball it means "to assign a player to a lesser ( farm) league," as opposed to a big league. [Mid-1600s]
See also: farm, out

fat farm

A clinic or resort where people go to lose weight, as in She spends all her vacations at a fat farm but it hasn't helped so far. This is a somewhat derisive term for such an establishment. [Colloquial; 1960s]
See also: farm, fat

buy the farm

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If someone buys the farm, they die. Sometimes I believed I was cured. Maybe I wasn't going to buy the farm after all. Note: A possible explanation for this expression is that, in wartime, American Air Force pilots sometimes said that they wanted to stop flying, buy a farm or ranch, and lead a peaceful life. `Buy the farm' then came to be used when a pilot was killed in a crash.
See also: buy, farm

bet the farm

risk everything that you own on a bet, investment, or enterprise. North American informal
See also: bet, farm

buy the farm

die. North American informal
This expression originated as US military slang, probably with the meaning that the pilot (or owner) of a crashed plane owes money to the farmer whose property or land is damaged in the crash.
See also: buy, farm

bet the ˈfarm/ˈranch

(American English) risk everything that you have on something: It might succeed but don’t bet the farm on it.It’s a bet-the-farm situation.
See also: bet, farm, ranch

buy the ˈfarm

(informal, humorous, especially American English) die: I’d like to visit India one day, before I buy the farm.This comes from the military, perhaps referring to the dream of many soldiers and pilots of buying a farm when the war was over.
See also: buy, farm

farm out

v.
1. To distribute or delegate something, especially a task or responsibility: The camp counselor farmed out the cleaning tasks to the campers. We farmed the chores out to the kids.
2. Baseball To demote a major-league player to a minor-league team: The coach decided to farm the catcher out until he improved. The struggling pitcher was farmed out yesterday.
See also: farm, out

buy it

tv. to die. (see also buy the farm, buy the big one.) He lay there coughing for a few minutes, and then he bought it.
See also: buy

buy the farm

tv. to die; to get killed. (The farm may be a grave site. No one knows the origin.) I’m too young to buy the farm.
See also: buy, farm

funny farm

n. an insane asylum; a psychiatric hospital. He’s really weird. They’re going to send him to the funny farm.
See also: farm, funny

buy it

Slang
To be killed.
See also: buy

buy the farm

Slang
To die, especially suddenly or violently.
See also: buy, farm

buy the farm

Die. This phrase comes from the military: members of the armed forces were issued insurance policies. Many servicemen speculated that when they returned to civilian life, they would buy a farm back home or pay off the mortgage on one that they or their parents owned. To die was literally to retire, and so combat victims were said to have “bought the farm.” Other phrases that mean “to die” are “cash in your chips” (as if checking out of a poker game), “fall off the perch” (an expiring caged bird), and “go South” (someone now living up North returning to his or her native soil).
See also: buy, farm
References in classic literature ?
He intended to go back to the farm and to his grandfather, but lost his way and for hours he wandered weeping and frightened on country roads.
Cloke says all the farms here could be made to pay.
Dagley complained to me the other day that he hadn't got a decent gate on his farm.
That was the life ideal, so Captain MacElrath considered, and he was prone to marvel that any man, not under compulsion, should leave a farm to go to sea.
The farm people knew Dorothy, having seen her when she was in the country before, and they treated the little girl with as much respect as they did the Emperor, because she was a friend of the powerful Princess Ozma.
Why, the owner does not know it for many years when a poet has put his farm in rhyme, the most admirable kind of invisible fence, has fairly impounded it, milked it, skimmed it, and got all the cream, and left the farmer only the skimmed milk.
First of all I'd read everything written on the subject, and subscribed to some of the best farm magazines and papers.
An uncle of mine would have left me enough money to buy all the farms I wanted, only an awful person, an English lord I wonder if you have heard of him?
On the farm thus acquired John Ferrier built himself a substantial log-house, which received so many additions in succeeding years that it grew into a roomy villa.
We saw more of our country neighbours now than when we lived on the farm.
I told mother last night if there was likely to be any more children while I was away I'd have to be sent for, for when there's a baby it always takes Hannah and me both, for mother has the cooking and the farm.
For if he's anywhere on the farm we can send for him in a minute.
The boy's cold, blue eyes became the color of ice, as he retorted: "If I ever make a farm out o' this dust, I'll sure 'ave earned it.
She turned when she saw him coming, and walked beside him towards Mercy Farm, keeping step with him as they walked.
He used to drive in from his farm every day at about noon, and as that was my own hour for fetching my mail I often passed him in the porch or stood beside him while we waited on the motions of the distributing hand behind the grating.