farm

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Related to farmed: farmed salmon, Farmed fish, farmed out

fat farm

A slightly derogatory term for a clinic, treatment center, or resort that is aimed at helping people lose weight. My weight ballooned after the inactivity that resulted from my surgery, so I'm heading to the fat farm this summer to try to get it back to normal.
See also: farm, fat

bought the farm

Died. Did you hear that old Walt bought the farm? What a shame—at least he got to spend 92 years on this earth.
See also: bought, farm

funny farm

Derogatory slang for a psychiatric hospital or mental health facility. If I don't take a vacation soon, I'll be headed to the funny farm.
See also: farm, funny

buy the farm

 and buy it
Sl. to die; to get killed. (The farm is a burial plot.) I'll pass through this illness; I'm too young to buy the farm. He lived for a few hours after his collapse, but then he bought it.
See also: buy, farm

farm someone out

 
1. [for someone in control] to send someone to work for someone else. I have farmed my electrician out for a week, so your work will have to wait. We farmed out the office staff.
2. to send a child away to be cared for by someone; to send a child to boarding school. We farmed the kids out to my sister for the summer. We farmed out the kids.
See also: farm, out

farm something out

 
1. to deplete the fertility of land by farming too intensely. They farmed their land out through careless land management. They farmed out their land.
2. to send work to someone to be done away from one's normal place of business; to subcontract work. We farmed the assembly work out. We always farm out the actual final assembly of the finished units.
See also: farm, out

sell the farm

 and bet the farm
Fig. to liquidate all one's assets in order to raise money to invest in something. It's a risky proposition. I wouldn't bet the farm on it.
See also: farm, sell

You can bet the farm (on someone or something).

Rur. You can be certain of someone or something. This is a good investment. You can bet the farm on it. You can bet the farm that Joe is gonna get that job.
See also: bet, can, farm

bet the farm

to risk everything you have because you are certain of something bet the ranch No matter how confident you are in the future, you should never bet the farm on one idea.
See also: bet, farm

farm out something (to somebody)

also farm something out (to somebody)
to give work or responsibilities to other people Magazines often farm out articles to freelance writers. If you can't finish the reports by next week, you should farm them out.
See also: farm, out

farm out somebody (to somebody)

also farm somebody out (to somebody)
to give someone to someone else who will take care of them She farmed out her children to her brother for two weeks.
See also: farm, out

bet the farm/ranch

  (American)
to spend almost all the money you have on something that you think might bring you success (often + on ) TV networks are obviously willing to bet the ranch on special sports events - they paid millions to broadcast the Olympics.
See also: bet, farm

factory farming

a system for producing eggs, meat, and milk quickly and cheaply by keeping animals in small closed areas and giving them food which makes them grow quickly They've launched a campaign against the abuses of factory farming. (mainly British)
See also: factory, farm

a funny farm

  (humorous)
a hospital for people who are mentally ill
Usage notes: This expression may be offensive in some situations.
If things get much worse they'll be carrying me off to the funny farm.
See also: farm, funny

buy it

1. Suffer a severe reversal, as in If they can't raise the money in time, they'll buy it. [Slang; mid-1900s]
2. Be killed; die. For example, By the time we could get to the hospital, he had bought it. Originating during World War I as military slang, this term later was extended to peacetime forms of death. A later slang equivalent is buy the farm, dating from about 1950. For example, He'll soon buy the farm riding that motorcycle. According to J.E. Lighter, it alludes to training flights crashing in a farmer's field, causing the farmer to sue the government for damages sufficient to pay off the farm's mortgage. Since the pilot usually died in such a crash, he in effect bought the farm with his life.
3. Believe it; see buy something.
See also: buy

buy the farm

see under buy it.
See also: buy, farm

farm out

Assign something to an outsider; subcontract something. For example, The contractor was so busy he had to farm out two jobs to a colleague, or When their mother was hospitalized, the children had to be farmed out to the nearest relatives . This term originally referred to letting or leasing land. Today it usually refers to subcontracting work or the care of a dependent to another. In baseball it means "to assign a player to a lesser ( farm) league," as opposed to a big league. [Mid-1600s]
See also: farm, out

fat farm

A clinic or resort where people go to lose weight, as in She spends all her vacations at a fat farm but it hasn't helped so far. This is a somewhat derisive term for such an establishment. [Colloquial; 1960s]
See also: farm, fat

farm out

v.
1. To distribute or delegate something, especially a task or responsibility: The camp counselor farmed out the cleaning tasks to the campers. We farmed the chores out to the kids.
2. Baseball To demote a major-league player to a minor-league team: The coach decided to farm the catcher out until he improved. The struggling pitcher was farmed out yesterday.
See also: farm, out

buy it

tv. to die. (see also buy the farm, buy the big one.) He lay there coughing for a few minutes, and then he bought it.
See also: buy

buy the farm

tv. to die; to get killed. (The farm may be a grave site. No one knows the origin.) I’m too young to buy the farm.
See also: buy, farm

funny farm

n. an insane asylum; a psychiatric hospital. He’s really weird. They’re going to send him to the funny farm.
See also: farm, funny

buy it

Slang
To be killed.
See also: buy

buy the farm

Slang
To die, especially suddenly or violently.
See also: buy, farm

buy the farm

Die. This phrase comes from the military: members of the armed forces were issued insurance policies. Many servicemen speculated that when they returned to civilian life, they would buy a farm back home or pay off the mortgage on one that they or their parents owned. To die was literally to retire, and so combat victims were said to have “bought the farm.” Other phrases that mean “to die” are “cash in your chips” (as if checking out of a poker game), “fall off the perch” (an expiring caged bird), and “go South” (someone now living up North returning to his or her native soil).
See also: buy, farm
References in periodicals archive ?
Restriction of DLC intake to an incremental increase of 20% greater than background requires a substantial reduction in meal frequency of farmed and wild salmon (Figure 1).
EPA 2002) for DLCs in tissues of farmed and wild salmon results in upper-bound cancer risks as high as 1 x [10.
Many farmed Atlantic salmon contain dioxin concentrations that, when consumed at modest rates, pose elevated cancer and noncancer health risks.
Although both farmed and wild salmon are sold commercially within and outside the United States, the FDA has not established a tolerance or other administrative level of DLCs for commercially sold fish or for other foods.
Our assessment of contaminants in farmed and wild salmon (Foran et al.
The feed of farmed salmon appears to be the source of DLCs and many other organic contaminants to these fish (Hites et al 2004a).
A survey of metals in farmed Atlantic and wild Pacific salmon.
Global assessment of organic contaminants in farmed salmon.
In fact, the least-contaminated farmed salmon (from Washington state and Chile) contained significantly higher levels of PCBs and other carcinogens than most wild salmon--high enough to trigger advice from the U.
Farmed salmon from Canada, Maine, and Norway were twice as contaminated as salmon from Washington state and Chile.
Here's what the Pew study boils down to: if you eat a six-ounce serving of cooked farmed salmon from Washington state or Chile once a month for your entire life, your risk of getting cancer rises by roughly one in 100,000.
If all 100,000 ate farmed salmon from Washington state or Chile once a month, the number of cancer cases would climb by just one, to 33,001.
today ate farmed salmon once a week, there would be somewhere between 300 and 2,400 extra cancer cases during their lifetimes.
Eating farmed salmon reduces your risk of dying of a sudden heart attack far more than it increases your risk of cancer.
it has one-eighth the level of pollutants of farmed salmon from Chile or Washington state.