fare

(redirected from fared)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

to a fare-thee-well

1. To a state or condition of utmost perfection or completion. Her new house is absolutely gorgeous! They've designed it to a fare-thee-well.
2. To the greatest or furthest degree possible. After the economy crashed, the government began whittling down social welfare to a fare-thee-well. The home team trounced their opponents, beating them to a fare-thee-well.

fare thee well

The highest degree; perfection. Wow, you really played that part to a fare thee well—I'm so impressed!
See also: fare, thee, well

to a fare-thee-well

To the most extreme degree, especially a condition of perfection. For example, We've cleaned the house to a fare-thee-well, or He played the part of martyr to a fare-thee-well. This term first appeared as to a fare-you-well in the late 1800s, and the more archaic-sounding present form replaced it about 1940.

fare against

v.
To perform or function at a level comparable with that of something or someone else: I wonder how well the new car models fare against the old ones.
See also: fare

fare up

v.
To perform or function successfully at a level comparable with or equal to that of something or someone else; fare against: They worked hard to win the competition, but in the end they didn't fare up. My performance didn't fare up to that of the other players.
See also: fare, up
References in classic literature ?
Thereon Circe came up to me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, tell your men to leave off crying; I know how much you have all of you suffered at sea, and how ill you have fared among cruel savages on the mainland, but that is over now, so stay here, and eat and drink till you are once more as strong and hearty as you were when you left Ithaca; for at present you are weakened both in body and mind; you keep all the time thinking of the hardships you have suffered during your travels, so that you have no more cheerfulness left in you.
So the duke had more than enough to think about; accordingly he fared at chess as he had fared at tennis; he made blunder upon blunder and the officer with whom he played found him easy game.
Has, then, your house fared so well at the hands of the Trojans?
Norris, a friend of her brother-in-law, with scarcely any private fortune, and Miss Frances fared yet worse.
At daybreak D'Artagnan saddled Furet, who had fared sumptuously all night, devouring the remainder of the oats and hay left by his companions.
The third fared no better, for the peasant again said: 'Grete, that is the third.