fanny


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fanny about

1. To waste time or procrastinate by doing something unproductive or unhelpful; to fool around or spend time idly. Primarily heard in UK. Would you quit fannying about and give me a hand cleaning the house? I should have started this essay last week, but I've been fannying about with my new video game console.
2. To wander around a place, especially in an aimless or idle manner. Primarily heard in UK. After I quit my job, I spent six months fannying about Paris.
See also: fanny

fanny around

1. To waste time or procrastinate by doing something unproductive or unhelpful; to fool around or spend time idly. Primarily heard in UK. Would you quit fannying around and give me a hand cleaning the house? I should have started this essay last week, but I've been fannying around with my new video game console.
2. To wander around a place, especially in an aimless or meandering manner. Primarily heard in UK. After I quit my job, I spent six months fannying around Paris.
See also: around, fanny

Fanny Adams

obsolete A ration of tinned mutton, as provided upon a naval ship. This macabre sobriquet was taken from the name of an eight-year-old girl who was brutally murdered in 1867, thus likening the quality of the meat rations to the remains of the young girl. I swear if I have to eat Fanny Adams one more time, I will throw myself overboard.
See also: Adam, fanny

sweet Fanny Adams

rude slang Nothing. The term is a euphemism, based on the initials of "Fanny Adams" ("FA"), for "fuck all," which means the same thing. Sometimes shortened to "sweet FA." I worked there for 20 years and was dismissed with sweet Fanny Adams to show for it!
See also: Adam, fanny, sweet

sweet Fanny Adams

absolutely nothing at all. informal
Fanny Adams was the youthful victim in a famous murder case in 1867 , her body being mutilated and cut to pieces by the killer. With gruesome black humour, her name came to be used as a slang term for a type of tinned meat or stew recently introduced to the Royal Navy; the current meaning developed early in the 20th century. Sweet Fanny Adams is often abbreviated in speech to sweet FA , which is understood by many to be a euphemism for sweet fuck all .
See also: Adam, fanny, sweet

fanny

n. the buttocks. (Euphemistic in the U.S. The term has taboo implications in the U.K.) He fell down right on his fanny.

fanny-bumper

n. an event that draws so many people that they bump into one another. There was a typically dull fanny-bumper in the village last night.

fanny-dipper

n. a swimmer, as opposed to a surfer. (California.) The fanny-dippers are not supposed to go out that far.
References in classic literature ?
Perhaps I might, Fanny,' said the mild Little Dorrit.
Especially as we know,' said Fanny, 'that there certainly is a tone in the place to which you have been so true, which does belong to it, and which does make it different from other aspects of Society.
One final means that Fanny employs to withstand her reification is reading.
Are we going back to the days of Fanny Elssler, where the modern-day equivalents to the John Durangs of old provide back-up artists to European stars?
Inside, Fanny (Dee Maaske) is recovering from a long illness and itching to get back on stage.
Metafictionality aside, Fanny is a reader-friendly, accessible work that subtly comments upon the dynamics of biographical veracity through the innovative employment of counterfactual narrative.
She gives us a Fanny who, at first at least, can't help but send herself up, even if - as she says in exasperation at one point - she's a "great big lump of talent".
The show traces Fanny's rise from vaudeville to the Sheridan in her role Fanny Brice biggest, most glamorous gig of the 1920s, the Ziegfeld Follies - all sparkles and feathers.
We asked Sheridan about her penchant for playing real life characters, and what she was most looking forward to about reprising the role of Fanny.
Balenciaga spring 2016 RTW revealed satin fanny packs in white, while Kenzo offered more modular takes on the style, often in blocks of black or white as an optical retreat from the dizzying prints of its collection.
If eighteenth-century literary debates about novel-reading and quixotism join the narrative function of speech-acts like the generalization and the precept to ground Raff's argument, the most significant--and controversial support comes in her analysis of the relationship between Austen and her niece, Fanny Knight.
Sheridan Smith as Fanny Brice in Funny Girl - but she has missed the last two performances Picture: MARC BRENNER
White and Kagawa both offer productive perspectives on space and identity, but I want to argue more specifically that Fanny participates in the construction of her subjectivity by deriving agency from the assemblages of nonhuman materiality within the domestic spaces in which she is confined.
He worked as a groom in the stables of the castle - which in those days was known as Barrogill Castle - and Lady Fanny fell in love with him.
Because the world would have been a better place if TV bosses had believed original celebrity chef, Fanny Cradock, who said the kitchen was no place for men but reluctantly allowed her husband into hers after she'd cooked on the grounds that "every Fanny needs a Johnnie".