fan

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Related to fanned: stick with, make it to, in line with, fanned out

fair-weather fan

A person who is supportive of and enthusiastic about a sports team only when that team is performing well. I've been rooting for the home team in their playoff run, but I'll admit I'm just a fair-weather fan.
See also: fan

fan dance

1. Literally, a striptease or exotic dance employing the use of large fans to conceal, suggest, or slowly reveal the nudity of the performer. While striptease is often relegated in the public imagination to seedy bars and desperate women, the fan dances performed in this club are truly beautiful.
2. By extension, any incremental exposure or divulgence of information, especially that which is tantalizing or of great interest. The filmmaker has been doing something of a fan dance over the past few weeks, offering tiny bits of information about who will be in his upcoming blockbuster.
See also: dance, fan

*fan of someone

to be a follower of someone; to idolize someone. (*Typically: be ~; become ~.) My mother is still a fan of the Beatles. I'm a great fan of the mayor of the town.
See also: fan, of

fan out

Fig. to spread out over a wide area. The searchers fanned out, looking for the child lost in the woods. Let's fan out and search a wider area.
See also: fan, out

fan out (from some place)

to spread outward from a particular area. The paths seem to fan out from the wide trail that starts at the house. The trails fanned out and soon we were all separated.
See also: fan, out

fan something out

to spread something out so that all parts can be seen better. (As one opens a wood and paper fan.) Todd fanned the cards out so we could see which ones he held. He fanned out the cards.
See also: fan, out

fan the breeze

Fig. to chat or gossip. We're just fanning the breeze, so you didn't interrupt anything. Stop fanning the breeze and get to work.
See also: breeze, fan

fan the flames (of something)

Fig. to make something more intense; to make a situation worse. The riot fanned the flames of racial hatred even more. The hostility in the school is bad enough without anyone fanning the flames.
See also: fan, flame

hit the fan

Inf. Fig. to become publicly known; to become a scandal. (From the phrase when the shit hit the fan.) I wasn't even in the country when it hit the fan. It hit the fan, and within ten minutes the press had spread it all over the world.
See also: fan, hit

when the shit hits the fan

Sl. when all the expected trouble materializes. When the shit hits the fan, you had better be prepared to support those of us who are involved in this mess.
See also: fan, hit, shit

fan out

to spread over a wide area The police fanned out across the park.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of fan (a device you open and wave in front of you to cool yourself)
See also: fan, out

something hits the fan

(slang)
bad things develop or suddenly become known After I learned I had cancer, I realized you need laughter more than ever when things hit the fan.
Related vocabulary: the shit hits the fan
See also: fan, hit

fan the flames (of something)

to cause an increase in negative feelings These images of war could be used to fan the flames of hatred against our country.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of fan the flames (to cause air to flow toward a fire)
See also: fan, flame

the shit hits the fan

(rude)
extremely unpleasant things happen and become known The company's busy season was upon them once more, and the shit was hitting the fan.
Related vocabulary: something hits the fan
See also: fan, hit, shit

fan the flames

to cause anger or other bad feelings to increase (usually + of ) His speeches fanned the flames of racial tension.
See also: fan, flame

the shit hits the fan

  (taboo)
if the shit hits the fan, a person or an organization gets into serious trouble If Dad finds out how much money you spent, the shit will really hit the fan.
See scare the shit out of
See also: fan, hit, shit

fan the flames

Intensify or stir up feelings; exacerbate an explosive situation. For example, She already found him attractive, but his letters really fanned the flames, or His speech fanned the flames of racial dissension.
See also: fan, flame

shit will hit the fan, the

Also, when or then the shit hits the fan . There will be major trouble, often following the disclosure of a piece of information. For example, When they find out they were firing on their own planes, the shit will hit the fan. This idiom calls up the graphic image of feces spread by a rapidly revolving electric fan. [ Vulgar slang; c. 1930]
See also: hit, shit, will

fan out

v.
1. To move or project outward from a central source or point: The troops landed on the beachhead and fanned out.
2. To lay out or place something in a fanlike shape: I fanned the cards out on the table. They fanned out the photos on the desk so we could see them.
See also: fan, out

fan

tv. to ignore someone or something; to cut a class; to blow someone/something off. (Fan = blow as in blow someone off. Fan, from fanatic meaning “devotee” or “admirer” is very old and is Standard English.) You have to meet with your teacher? Oh, fan that. It doesn’t matter.

fan the breeze

tv. to chat or gossip. We’re just fanning the breeze, so you didn’t interrupt anything.
See also: breeze, fan

hit the fan

tv. to become publicly known; to become a scandal. (From the phrase when the shit hit the fan.) It hit the fan, and within ten minutes the press had spread it all over the world.
See also: fan, hit

when the shit hits the fan

tv. when all the expected trouble materializes. (Usually objectionable.) When the shit hits the fan, you had better be prepared to support those of us who are involved in this mess. We had one hell of an afternoon around here. Where were you when the shit hit the fan?
See also: fan, hit, shit

hit the fan

Slang
To have serious, usually adverse consequences.
See also: fan, hit

when the shit hits the fan

When the situation goes awry; when trouble starts.
See also: fan, hit, shit
References in classic literature ?
Hot, sweet breath against his cheek and mouth had fanned a new flame to life within his breast, and perfect lips had clung to his in burning kisses that had seared a deep brand into his soul--a brand which marked a new Tarzan.
But these warm arms about his neck, the sweet perfume of the breath that fanned his cheek; these were no dream!
The hot, humid atmosphere of Caspak condenses as it is fanned by the cold Antarctic air-currents which sweep across the crater's top, sending a tenuous ribbon of vapor far out across the Pacific.
He took off his hat and fanned himself thoughtfully as he walked.
He laid her upon the sofa, poured some water over her face, and fanned her with a newspaper.
The first breath of the wind, faint and silken, tonic with life, fanned through his dry-baked body as he finished reading.
Back it came, with the editor's regrets, and Martin sent it to San Francisco again, this time to THE HORNET, a pretentious monthly that had been fanned into a constellation of the first magnitude by the brilliant journalist who founded it.
A strong breeze soon fanned the spark into a flame, and the eaglets, as yet unfledged and helpless, were roasted in their nest and dropped down dead at the bottom of the tree.