fancy

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Related to fancying: fancying chances

I don't fancy yours (much)

Said by one man to another to indicate a woman he thinks is unattractive. Primarily heard in UK. I was mortified when Bob said, "I don't fancy yours much," as a young woman passed by us on the street.
See also: fancy

a passing fancy

Something that captures one's interest or enthusiasm for only a brief period of time. Jim was really into learning about horticulture for a while, but it turned out to be only a passing fancy. I played a few sports during college, but they were all just passing fancies.
See also: fancy, passing

catch (someone's) fancy

To be appealing or pleasant to someone; to be intriguing or of interest to someone. A: "Do you want to go to a movie later on?" B: "I don't know, there's nothing that really catches my fancy in theaters right now." I'm not going to declare my major until I've had a couple years in college to see what ends up catching my fancy.
See also: catch, fancy

flight of fancy

An imaginative but unrealistic idea. No one took his campaign for office seriously because his proposed solutions to problems were filled with flights of fancy.
See also: fancy, flight, of

be footloose and fancy-free

To be free of responsibilities, including romantic commitments (a fact that is often highlighted when this phrase is used). I love being a single woman, so I intend to be footloose and fancy-free for a long time. Now that I have a family and a mortgage, I miss being footloose and fancy-free.
See also: and, footloose

take a fancy to (someone or something)

To have or develop a fondness for or inclination toward something or someone; to be attracted to or desire someone or something. I think Jennifer has taken a fancy to my friend Tommy, so I'm going to try to set them up on a date! I never used to like raisins as a kid, but I've taken a fancy to them as I've grown older.
See also: fancy, take

fancy-pants

Pretentious. Use of this phrase usually indicates the speaker's annoyance. I'd rather go to a ball game than another one of your fancy-pants corporate events.

strike (one's) fancy

To be appealing or pleasant to someone; to be intriguing or of interest to someone. A: "Do you want to go to a movie later on?" B: "I don't know, there's nothing that really strikes my fancy in theaters right now." I'm not going to declare my major until I've had a couple years in college to see what ends up striking my fancy.
See also: fancy, strike

take (one's) fancy

To be appealing or pleasant to someone; to be intriguing or of interest to someone. A: "Do you want to go to a movie later on?" B: "I don't know, there's nothing that really takes my fancy in theaters right now." I'm not going to declare my major until I've had a couple years in college to see what ends up taking my fancy.
See also: fancy, take

tickle (one's) fancy

To be appealing or pleasant to someone; to be intriguing or of interest to someone. A: "Do you want to go to a movie later on?" B: "I don't know, there's nothing that really tickles my fancy in theaters right now." I'm not going to declare my major until I've had a couple years in college to see what ends up tickling my fancy.
See also: fancy, tickle

fancy footwork

 
1. Lit. clever and intricate dance steps. The old man was known for his fancy footwork when he was on Broadway.
2. Lit. adroit movements of the feet that help someone retain balance or move through treacherous territory. It took some fancy footwork to get down the mountain carrying the injured child.
3. Fig. a clever and intricate strategy that helps someone get out of trouble. The governor did some fancy footwork to keep from getting blamed for the scandal.
See also: fancy, footwork

Fancy meeting you here!

I am very surprised to meet you here! Tom: Hi, Sue! Fancy meeting you here! Sue: Hi, Tom. I was thinking the same thing about you. "Fancy meeting you here," said Mr. Franklin when he bumped into the company president at the racetrack.
See also: fancy, meeting

fancy someone as someone or something

to imagine that someone were someone else or some particular type of person. Can you fancy her as a zookeeper? I can fancy him as a tall, dark stranger. I really don't fancy myself as a farmer.
See also: fancy

fancy someone's chances

to have confidence in someone's [including one's own] ability to be successful. We all think she will refuse to go out with him, but he certainly fancies his own chances. The other contestants are so talented that I don't fancy his chances at all.
See also: chance, fancy

Fancy that!

 and Imagine that!
I am very surprised to hear that.; That is hard to imagine or believe. Mary: My father was elected president of the board. Sally: Fancy that! Sue: This computer is ten times faster than the one we had before. Jane: Imagine that! Is it easy to operate? Sue: Of course not.
See also: fancy

flight of fancy

an idea or suggestion that is out of touch with reality or possibility. What is the point in indulging in flights of fancy about exotic vacations when you cannot even afford the rent?
See also: fancy, flight, of

footloose and fancy-free

Fig. without long-term responsibilities or commitments. All the rest of them have wives, but John is footloose and fancy-free. Mary never stays long in any job. She likes being footloose and fancy-free.
See also: and, footloose

strike someone's fancy

to appeal to someone. I'll have some ice cream, please. Chocolate strikes my fancy right now. Why don't you go to the store and buy a CD that strikes your fancy?
See also: fancy, strike

suit someone's fancy

to appeal to someone's imagination, fantasy, or preferences. Does this handbag suit your fancy, or would you prefer something larger? I think a big bowl of ice cream would suit my fancy quite nicely.
See also: fancy, suit

take a fancy to someone or something

 and take a liking to someone or something; take a shine to someone or something
to develop a fondness or a preference for someone or something. John began to take a fancy to Sally late last August at the picnic. I've never taken a liking to cooked carrots. I think my teacher has taken a shine to me.
See also: fancy, take

tickle someone's fancy

to interest someone; to make someone curious. I have an interesting problem here that I think will tickle your fancy. This doesn't tickle my fancy at all. This is dull and boring.
See also: fancy, tickle

flight of fancy

An unrealistic idea or fantastic notion, a pipe dream. For example, She engaged in flights of fancy, such as owning a million-dollar house. This idiom uses flight in the sense of "a soaring of the imagination," a usage dating from the mid-1600s.
See also: fancy, flight, of

footloose and fancy-free

Having no attachments, especially romantic ones, and free to do as one pleases. For example, When I was in my twenties, footloose and fancy-free, I would travel at the drop of a hat . Both of these words have long been used separately; their pairing dates only from the 1900s.
See also: and, footloose

take a fancy to

Also, take a liking or shine to . Be attracted to someone or something, as in They took a fancy to spicy foods after their Mexican vacation, or I'm hoping he'll take a liking to the water, now that we have a cottage on a lake, or We think Bill's taken a shine to Betsy. The first term was first recorded in 1541, the first variant in 1570, and the last, a colloquialism, in 1850.
See also: fancy, take

tickle one's fancy

Appeal to one, be to one's liking, as in That joke tickled my fancy. This term uses fancy in the sense of "liking" or "taste." [Second half of 1700s]
See also: fancy, tickle

a flight of fancy

or

a flight of fantasy

COMMON If you call an idea, statement, or plan a flight of fancy or a flight of fantasy, you mean that it is imaginative but not at all practical. This is no flight of fancy. The prototype is already flying, and production is to begin next year. The idea that you could use these satellites as weapons is a complete flight of fantasy.
See also: fancy, flight, of

footloose and fancy-free

OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is footloose and fancy-free, they are not married or in a long-term relationship, or they have very few responsibilities. He was footloose and fancy-free. He could go to parties and pubs on his own, and come and go as he pleased. Note: This term refers to a sail that could move about freely because the ropes holding it at the foot or bottom were loose.
See also: and, footloose

fancy footwork

and fast footwork
n. artful maneuvering; fast and clever thinking. Ken did a lot of fancy footwork to get out of that one.
See also: fancy, footwork

Fancy that!

exclam. Imagine that! Fancy that! There’s a piece of pie left in the fridge.
See also: fancy

fancy-schmancy

(ˈfæntsiˈʃmæntsi)
mod. fancy; very fancy. This one is just too fancy-schmancy for Heidi.

footloose and fancy free

Unattached, especially romantically, and able to move and act without responsibilities. The “foot” is the bottom of a sail, and a sail that is footloose is free to move whichever way the wind blows. So is a person who is “footloose and fancy free,” at liberty to follow any and all whims. (Such a state sounds enviable, but keep in mind the fable about “The Grasshopper and the Ant.”)
See also: and, fancy, footloose, free
References in classic literature ?
And she began fancying the sort of thing that would happen: `"Miss Alice
Katerina Ivanovna, however, put off expressing her feelings for the time and contented herself with treating her coldly, though she decided inwardly that she would certainly have to put Amalia Ivanovna down and set her in her proper place, for goodness only knew what she was fancying herself.