fall

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Related to falling: Falling water
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fall

1. verb To be arrested for a crime. Can you believe that mob kingpin finally fell?
2. noun One's arrest for a crime. I refuse to take the fall when I was barely involved in this to begin with.

fall

1. in. to be arrested; to be charged with a crime. (see also fall guy.) I heard that Mooshoo fell. Is that right?
2. n. one’s arrest; being arrested and charged. (Underworld.) Who took the fall for the bank job?

fall

foul/afoul
1. Nautical To collide. Used of vessels.
2. To clash: fell foul of the law.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence shows that a comprehensive fall prevention program that uses a valid and clinically tested screening tool, has staff support, and includes fall risk interventions in the EMR provides the best outcome to assist in identifying those at risk for falling (Kramlich & Dende, 2016).
Examination by logistic regression modelling of the variables which increase the relative risk of elderly women falling compared to elderly men.
Results showed a toileting-related fall tended to be associated with having a previous fall, having physical restraints in use, and being at risk for falling (the answer to research question 1).
In contrast, the "stoic" group had a high actual but low perceived fall risk, which was protective for falling, and related to a positive outlook on life, physical activity, and community participation.
Falling is such a serious matter that scientists at the Human Movement and Balance Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh want to know exactly why some people are more likely to topple over than others are.
A long fall is better than getting gobbled up by a predator, and previous research has described increased "ant rain," a shower of ants falling from a tree-top, after a bird lands.
Many authorities cite fear of falling as a leading precursor to falling.
On the film I silently state everything which has to do with falling.
But falling occurs also on the level ground, in ordinary life, as when pioneers stumbled during a blizzard or when travelers leave their marooned autos along the drift-full highway.
A breeze, a step, a scampering squirrel, even the light touch of a falling twig sets off a cascade of rustling.
The unfortunate thing about falling, of course, is that you usually don't have control over when or where it happens.
Only a prestudy history of falls was statistically associated with falling during the study period using univariate analysis ([X.
For older adults, the risk of falling increases rapidly with age (Amador & Loera, 2006).
VAN NUYS -- The residents of Elkwood Street joke that the name of their cul-de-sac should be Falling Limbs Lane.
In the short-term (three to five years), Japan's shrinking population (expected to start falling by 2007) will shrink the labor force, tighten labor market conditions, and lower the jobless rate.