fall out


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fall out

 
1. to happen; to result. As things fell out, we had a wonderful trip. What fell out of our discussion was a decision to continue.
2. to leave one's place in a formation when dismissed. (Usually in scouting or the military. The opposite of fall in.) The scouts fell out and ran to the campfire. All the soldiers fell out and talked among themselves.
3. to depart. It's late, George. I have to fall out. Let's fall out. I have to get up early in the morning.
See also: fall, out

fall out

(of something) to topple out of something. Mary fell out of the tree and hurt herself.
See also: fall, out

fall out (with someone) (over something)

 and fall out (with someone) (about someone or something)
to quarrel or disagree with someone about something. Tony fell out with Nick about the video game. Bill fell out with Sally over the question of buying a new car. Bill fell out with John about who would sleep on the bottom bunk.
See also: fall, out

fall out

1. Leave one's place in military ranks, as in After inspection they were ordered to fall out. [First half of 1800s]
2. Also, have a falling-out. Disagree, quarrel, as in The brothers fell out over their inheritance, or They no longer speak-they had a falling-out some years ago. [First half of 1500s]
3. Happen, result, as in Let us know how it falls out in the end. [Second half of 1500s]
See also: fall, out

fall out

v.
1. To drop from something: I accidentally knocked my toolbox over and all of my nails fell out.
2. To come out of place. Used of teeth: When I was 12, my last baby tooth fell out. If you don't get your cavity filled, your tooth will fall out!
3. To occur as a natural consequence; turn out: These results fall out directly from the experimental evidence.
4. To come or be revealed to be known, especially by chance: Over the course of their conversation, it fell out that they had all once lived in Chicago.
5. To break a relationship or form a negative relationship as a result of a dispute: The siblings fell out over the inheritance. The law firm was disbanded after the partners fell out.
6. fall out with To break a relationship or form a negative relationship with someone: After John fell out with Alice, they sold their house.
See also: fall, out

fall out

in. to depart. (Probably from the military command meaning disperse.) Let’s fall out. I have to get up early in the morning.
See also: fall, out
References in periodicals archive ?
From family fall outs to bridesmaids' bust-ups, the owner Abbi Lewis has seen it all.
Ken Barlow and Mike Baldwin's lasted decades (mainly over Deirdre, left), but there have been many more fall outs and fights over the years.