fairy

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Related to fairies: Types of fairies

away with the fairies

A bit crazy. I can't follow what your mom is talking about—it's like she's away with the fairies all of a sudden.
See also: away, fairy

fairy godmother

1. In children's fairy tales, a woman with magical powers who appears in order to help others in their time of need. Cinderella's fairy godmother helped her get ready for the ball so she could meet Prince Charming.
2. Someone who helps others with their problems, usually providing financial assistance. Thank you so much for helping me with my car repair bill! You are my fairy godmother.
See also: fairy, godmother

fairy godmother

someone who helps you solve your problems These children, sent to school without lunch or lunch money and sometimes without shoes, were in need of a fairy godmother. If a fairy godmother offered most editors a single wish, it would probably be the ability to predict sales.
Etymology: based on a character in a fairy tale (traditional story) who uses magic to help people
See also: fairy, godmother

airy-fairy

  (British informal)
not practical or not useful in real situations She's talking about selling her house and buying an old castle in Ireland. It all sounds a bit airy-fairy to me.

be away with the fairies

  (humorous)
to be slightly mad It's no good asking her to look after the children - she's away with the fairies most of the time.
See also: away, fairy

a fairy godmother

someone who helps you solve your problems, usually by giving you money
Usage notes: In children's stories, a fairy godmother is a woman with magic powers who helps someone who is in trouble.
A local company acted as fairy godmother to the theatre by giving a £1 million donation.
See also: fairy, godmother

fairy godmother

A generous benefactor, as in An anonymous fairy godmother donated the money for the new organ. This expression alludes to a stock character in fairy tales such as Cinderella, who gives unexpected and much needed assistance. [Late 1800s]
See also: fairy, godmother

tooth fairy

A mythical source of bounty, as in So who will finance this venture-the tooth fairy? This expression refers to the fairy credited with leaving money under a child's pillow in place of a baby tooth that has fallen out, a practice popular with American parents since the first half of the 1900s.
See also: fairy, tooth

airy-fairy

mod. insubstantial; of wishful thinking. I don’t care to hear any more of your airy-fairy ideas.

fairy

n. a male homosexual. (Rude and derogatory.) Bob got fired for calling Bill a fairy.

fairy tale

and bedtime story
n. a simplistic and condescending explanation for something; a lie. I don’t want to hear a fairy tale, just the facts, ma’am. I’ve already heard your little bedtime story. You’ll have to do better than that!
See also: fairy, tale
References in classic literature ?
Darker and more desolate seemed his stately home, and when the Fairies asked for flowers, he felt ashamed that he had none to give them.
His own, so cold and dark and dreary, his empty gardens where no flowers could bloom, no green trees dwell, or gay birds sing, all desolate and dim;--and while he gazed, his own Spirits, casting off their dark mantles, knelt before him and besought him not to send them forth to blight the things the gentle Fairies loved so much.
The old King, surrounded by the happy Fairies, sat in Violet's lovely home, and watched his icy castle melt away beneath the bright sunlight; while his Spirits, cold and gloomy no longer, danced with the Elves, and waited on their King with loving eagerness.
One of the great differences between the fairies and us is that they never do anything useful.
But it is not; it simply means that she is doing as she has seen the fairies do; she begins by following their ways, and it takes about two years to get her into the human ways.
The fairies are exquisite dancers, and that is why one of the first things the baby does is to sign to you to dance to him and then to cry when you do it.
Well, these tricky fairies sometimes slyly change the board on a ball night, so that it says the Gardens are to close at six-thirty for instance, instead of at seven.
If on such a night we could remain behind in the Gardens, as the famous Maimie Mannering did, we might see delicious sights, hundreds of lovely fairies hastening to the ball, the married ones wearing their wedding-rings round their waists, the gentlemen, all in uniform, holding up the ladies' trains, and linkmen running in front carrying winter cherries, which are the fairy-lanterns, the cloakroom where they put on their silver slippers and get a ticket for their wraps, the flowers streaming up from the Baby Walk to look on, and always welcome because they can lend a pin, the suppertable, with Queen Mab at the head of it, and behind her chair the Lord Chamberlain, who carries a dandelion on which he blows when Her Majesty wants to know the time.
The fairies sit round on mushrooms, and at first they are very well-behaved and always cough off the table, and so on, but after a bit they are not so well-behaved and stick their fingers into the butter, which is got from the roots of old trees, and the really horrid ones crawl over the table- cloth chasing sugar or other delicacies with their tongues.
But she was unacquainted with the tricky ways of the fairies, and so did not see (as Maimie and Tony saw at once) that they had changed the hour because there was to be a ball to-night.
They were now loath to let her go, for, "If the fairies see you," they warned her, "they will mischief you, stab you to death or compel you to nurse their children or turn you into something tedious, like an evergreen oak.
There were six horsemen in front and six behind, in the middle walked a prim lady wearing a long train held up by two pages, and on the train, as if it were a couch, reclined a lovely girl, for in this way do aristocratic fairies travel about.
Maimie also noticed that the whole cavalcade seemed to be in a passion, tilting their noses higher than it can be safe for even fairies to tilt them, and she concluded that this must be another case in which the doctor had said "Cold, quite cold
The fairies had as yet scarcely missed him, for they could not dance, so heavy were their hearts.
cried the doctor, and by this time of course the excitement among the spectators was tremendous, fairies fainting right and left.