extort from

extort something from someone or something

to steal something from someone by coercion; to force someone to give something by making threats. The crook was trying to extort a lot of money from the widow by selling her a worthless insurance policy. The authorities caught the accounting firm trying to extort a great deal of money from the bank.
References in classic literature ?
Stand up, Isaac, and hearken to me,'' said the Palmer, who viewed the extremity of his distress with a compassion in which contempt was largely mingled; ``you have cause for your terror, considering how your brethren have been used, in order to extort from them their hoards, both by princes and nobles; but stand up, I say, and I will point out to you the means of escape.
It is a well-known story of King John, that he confined a wealthy Jew in one of the royal castles, and daily caused one of his teeth to be torn out, until, when the jaw of the unhappy Israelite was half disfurnished, he consented to pay a large sum, which it was the tyrant's object to extort from him.
Its valuable contents, however, had been abstracted, and the magistrate in vain endeavored to extort from the prisoner the use which had been made of them, or the place of their concealment.
She did at last extort from her father an acknowledgment that the horses were engaged; Jane was therefore obliged to go on horseback, and her mother attended her to the door with many cheerful prognostics of a bad day.
KARACHI -- With Eid-ul-Fitr around the corner, many police personnel have entitled themselves to money that they extort from shopkeepers in the name of Eidi.
After weighing in the testimonies of Rychtar and Husek, as well as the conflicting statements of Vitangcol and De Vera, Ombudsman Conchita Carpio Morales said the 'totality of x x x circumstances, taken together with the affirmative declarations of complainant's witnesses,' would show that Vitangcol attempted to extort from Inekon in exchange for the contract.