extenuating circumstances


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extenuating circumstances

special (but otherwise unspecified) circumstances that account for an irregular or improper way of doing something. Mary was permitted to arrive late because of extenuating circumstances. Due to extenuating circumstances, the teacher will not meet with the class today.
See also: circumstance

extenuating circumstances

A situation or condition that provides an excuse for an action, as in Although Nancy missed three crucial rehearsals, there were extenuating circumstances, so she was not dismissed . This expression was originally legal terminology, denoting circumstances that partly excuse a crime and therefore call for less punishment or damages. [c. 1600]
See also: circumstance
References in periodicals archive ?
A spokesman for the University of Birmingham's Student Services team added: "The university classes extenuating circumstances as those which a student could not have predicted, has no control over or which seriously affect their ability to carry out an assessment.
She stressed that the burden of documenting extenuating circumstances and hardships would remain with mortgage applicants where it always has been.
The judge added: "It is therefore among the most exceptional and extenuating circumstances.
Their preliminary thoughts are to put the license "on hold" if the BSN is not completed, unless there are extenuating circumstances, resulting in an extension period.
For example, your policy might state that you will consider your employee to have voluntarily resigned after three consecutive "no call, no shows," unless there are extenuating circumstances.
Washington established three new theft-related crimes--theft with intent to resell, organized retail theft, and retail theft with extenuating circumstances, such as use of theft devices or leaving through an emergency exit.
Presiding Judge Takeshi Kaneko described the crime itself ''selfish'' and ''leaving no room for extenuating circumstances.
Of course there are sometimes extenuating circumstances as when Villa boss Martin O'Neill took an extended break from the game after leaving Celtic to care for his sick wife.
District officials take into account a student's record, whether it's a first or second offense, and other extenuating circumstances before meting out punishment.
However, short of outright acquittal, jurors could choose on their own initiative to convict with extenuating circumstances (circonstances attenuantes), a limiting factor applicable to all crimes in the Code Penal (Article 463), thanks to a law promulgated on 28 June 1832.
While no financial help can be given, we can help those with extenuating circumstances by devising a payment plan to spread the cost.
A spokeswoman for The Association of British Insurers says insurance companies are taking into account the extenuating circumstances of the past week and dealing with each case individually.
The new policy allows candidates who encounter extenuating circumstances during the two-year certification process to request, in writing, a single one-year extension before being assessed an application extension fee.
Moyes can certainly understand why supporters are getting agitated, although he feels there are extenuating circumstances which were always likely to make life difficult this summer.