expression


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hangdog expression

A self-pitying expression of abjection, defeat, shame, or guilt. Don't just stare at me with that hangdog expression. You've already made a mess of things, so now you have to deal with it! The losing team walked away from the pitch with hangdog expressions after their execrable defeat at the hands of their rivals.
See also: expression, hangdog

I guess

 and I expect; I suppose; I suspect 
1. a phrase that introduces a supposition. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bob: I guess it's going to rain. Bill: Oh, I don't know. Maybe so, maybe not. Alice: I expect you'll be wanting to leave pretty soon. John: Why? It's early yet.
2. a vague way of answering 'yes'. John: You want some more coffee? Jane: I 'spose. Alice: Ready to go? John: I spect.
See also: guess

I guess (so).

 and I believe so.; I expect (so).; I suppose (so).; I suspect (so).; I think so.
a vague expression of assent. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Tom: Will it rain today? Bob: I suppose so. Sue: Happy? Bill: I 'spect. Sue: You don't sound happy. Bill: I guess not.
See also: guess

if you'll pardon the expression

Fig. excuse the expression I am about to say or just said. This thing is—if you'll pardon the expression—loused up. I'm really jacked, if you'll pardon the expression.
See also: expression, if, pardon

not let someone catch someone doing something

 and not want to catch someone doing something
an expression that scolds someone who has done something wrong. (The idea is that the person ought not to do the wrong thing again, not that the person simply avoid getting caught.) How many times have I told you not to play ball in the house? Don't let me catch you doing that again. If I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times: Don't do that! I don't want to catch you doing it again!
See also: catch, doing, let, not

There, there.

 and There, now.
an expression used to comfort someone. There, there. You'll feel better after you take a nap. There, now. Everything will be all right.

There, there.

  (old-fashioned)
something that you say to comfort someone, especially a child There, there. You'll feel better in a minute.

if you’ll pardon the expression

phr. excuse the expression I am about to say. This thing is—if you’ll pardon the expression—loused up. I’m really jacked, if you’ll pardon the expression.
See also: expression, if, pardon
References in classic literature ?
The invalid's eye remained fixed, by which expression he intended to intimate that his resolution was unalterable.
The expression of impatience she now detected in her companion's eyes was like a flash of light to her.
It is true that, to use an expression of Walter Scott, Amelie stepped as if on eggs.
These two sentences are the simplest expression of the many ideas that Ginevra turned over in her mind for two days.
Tarzan was looking at her with an expression of puzzled bewilderment in his eyes as she glanced up at him.
He took it from her and taking the chain in his two hands he placed it about her neck, smiling at her expression of surprise at his unexpected gift.
The irrepressible landlady gave the freest expression to her feelings.
The first expression of surprise passed from her face.
I vaguely heard the voluble landlady's expressions of sympathy and regret; I mechanically took the smelling-bottle which my husband's mother offered to me, after hearing my name, as an act of kindness to a stranger
What is the author's attitude toward Nature--(1) does he view Nature in a purely objective way, as a mass of material things, a series of material phenomena or a mere embodiment of sensuous beauty; or (2) is there symbolism or mysticism in his attitude, that is--does he view Nature with awe as a spiritual power; or (3) is he thoroughly subjective, reading his own moods into Nature or using Nature chiefly for the expression of his moods?
Poetry, generally speaking, is the expression of the deeper nature; it belongs peculiarly to the realm of the spirit.
Again there was that curious expression in her eyes, an expression almost of secret terror, this time not wholly concealed.
He sat a little forward, a hand on either knee, his mouth ungracefully open, an expression of blank and utter bewilderment in his face.
She paused after I had spoken those words, and looked at me with a singular expression of perplexity and distress.
Her fingers twined together nervously in her lap, her eyes looked down again at the floor, and an expression of constraint settled on her face which looked almost like an expression of pain.